Este es un foro dedicado a las Fuerzas Armadas Mexicanas así como de los diferentes Cuerpos de Policía y demás entes que se dedican a la Seguridad interna de México.


Lituania restablece el servicio militar obligatorio

Comparte

Von Leunam
Capitán de Navio
Capitán de Navio

Mensajes : 6530
Masculino
Edad : 28
Localización : Imperial City, Coruscant

Lituania restablece el servicio militar obligatorio

Mensaje por Von Leunam el 24/2/2015, 5:53 pm

Lituania restablece el servicio militar obligatorio



Lituania planea reinstaurar el servicio militar obligatorio derogado en 2008 por las “amenazas” que la “situación geopolítica” actual proyecta sobre la región del Báltico, en alusión a la creciente tensión con Rusia, según informó este martes la oficina de la presidenta, Dalia Grybauskaite, en un comunicado. Con ese argumento, el Consejo Estatal de Defensa ha decidido que es preciso reforzar las capacidades defensivas del país exsoviético ahora miembro de la OTAN y la UE, y fronterizo con el enclave ruso de Kaliningrado, donde Moscú reforzó el pasado diciembre la presencia militar y la de navíos de guerra.

La restauración de la mili, que debe aprobar el Parlamento lituano, será por un plazo de un lustro y afectará anualmente a unos 3.500 hombres de 19 a 26 años, pero estarían exentos padres solteros y estudiantes universitarios.

El Ejército lituano cuenta ahora con una dotación profesional de 8.000 militares, a los que se añaden otros 4.500 reservistas voluntarios. Se prevé que los primeros nuevos conscriptos lleguen a los cuarteles lituanos el próximo otoño.

La preocupación lituana tras los acontecimientos de Ucrania y la anexión de Crimea por Rusia es ampliamente compartida por los demás Estados bálticos. El ministro de Defensa de Letonia ha sugerido que se incremente la dotación del Ejército hasta en 7.000 hombres, pero aún no hay planes concretos. Este país mantiene el servicio militar obligatorio.

Lituania, Letonia y Estonia, los tres miembros de la UE y de la OTAN, han aumentado sus presupuestos de defensa. Formaron parte de la URSS durante buena parte del siglo XX. Recuperaron la independencia en 1991, con la implosión de la Unión Soviética y ven en Rusia un potencial enemigo. La Alianza Atlántica, por su parte, ha incrementado las patrullas aéreas y la protección de estos Estados.

http://internacional.elpais.com/internacional/2015/02/24/actualidad/1424807694_938666.html

Don Vader
Darkest Lord Of The Sith

Mensajes : 2653
Masculino

Re: Lituania restablece el servicio militar obligatorio

Mensaje por Don Vader el 24/2/2015, 11:47 pm

A ver que tan patriotas salen los lituanos.

Von Leunam
Capitán de Navio
Capitán de Navio

Mensajes : 6530
Masculino
Edad : 28
Localización : Imperial City, Coruscant

Re: Lituania restablece el servicio militar obligatorio

Mensaje por Von Leunam el 16/3/2015, 7:53 pm

Lithuania prepares for a feared Russian invasion



The war in Ukraine has sent shock waves through Eastern Europe, and nowhere more so than in the Baltics. The Kremlin’s aggression since Russia’s annexation of Crimea has blurred the lines of the impossible. Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, all North Atlantic Treaty Organization member states, fear a Russian attack.

In tiny Lithuania the threat from Moscow feels so real that the country plans to reintroduce military conscription. Unlike Latvia and Estonia, Lithuania does not share a border with mainland Russia. To the south is Belarus, headed by Aleksander Lukashenko, Russian President Vladimir Putin’s puppet dictator. The Russian army is bolstering its bases there. To the west lies Kaliningrad, Russia’s heavily militarized exclave in northeast Europe.

Lithuania’s chief of defense, Jonas Vytautas Zukas, announced the plans for renewed military service. “A critical shortage of soldiers,” he explained, “prevents us from being properly prepared and poses a real threat to our national sovereignty.”

President Dalia Grybauskaite said restoring conscription was a “necessity” and Lithuania, with a population of almost 3 million, has “no other way to strengthen its army.” If parliament passes the bill, roughly 3,000 men between age 19 and 26 could be drafted into the army as early as this September.

One of Europe’s smallest militaries, the Lithuanian armed Forces now has 15,000 personnel. Since Lithuania joined NATO in 2004, it was largely prepared to contribute to any joint missions, such as Afghanistan or Kosovo, not for territorial defense. But Russia’s sharp revisionist turn has forced Vilnius to dramatically reconsider its security policy.

The return to conscription culminated a series of steps to prepare Lithuanians that the threat from Moscow is not imaginary. Fearing an incursion of Putin’s “little green men” — Russian soldiers who infiltrate foreign nations without insignia — Vilnius banned any wearing of military-style clothing without permission. Saturday, Berlin said that Lithuania was reportedly interested in buying tank howitzers. Last month, Lithuania’s defense ministry published a 98-page manual to gird citizens for the possibility of invasion, occupation and armed conflict.

After Russia’s annexation of Crimea, many security experts have warned that Moscow’s hybrid warfare could spread to the Baltics. But Marius Laurinavicius, a senior Lithuanian analyst at Vilnius’ Eastern Europe studies center, believes his country faces a real threat of conventional invasion from Kaliningrad.

“They [the Kremlin] need a corridor from Kaliningrad to mainland Russia,” Laurinavicius said, “just like they need one from Crimea to Donbas.”

Kaliningrad has long been an outpost for confrontation with the West. It was one key reason the Baltics joined NATO as late as 2004, five years after Central Europe’s post-communist states. Warning signs of the danger from the region were clear years before Russia’s Ukraine adventure.

In August 2013, for example, the Kremlin flaunted Kaliningrad’s armed might when Putin and Lukashenko raced their tanks in a massive military exercise near the Polish and Lithuanian borders. They shelled a 14th-century Prussian church.

But a scenario in which Russia invades the Baltics is only possible after Putin first tested his expansionist plans in Georgia and Ukraine. The European Union seems to believe that Moscow would never dare attack a NATO country. Laurinavicius, however, says the West is mistaken to view Putin through the prism of its own values. “Putin,” he said, “does not believe NATO will defend such, in his view, unimportant countries, risking nuclear confrontation.”

Other analysts warn that Putin could use ethnic Russian populations in the Baltics as a pretext for intervention. But Lithuania’s Russian population is far smaller than that of Latvia or Estonia. The country’s 200,000 Poles make up Lithuania’s largest ethnic minority. It is to them that the Kremlin has turned to.

The Polish minority’s political party, Electoral Action of Poles in Lithuania, is shrouded in controversy. Its leader, Waldemar Tomaszewski, slammed Ukraine’s Maidan protests, has compared the Crimea annexation to Kosovo and publicly wore the St. George ribbon, a Russian award for bravery established by the tsars in the early 19th century and now adopted by Russian-backed rebels in eastern Ukraine. Allied with Lithuania’s ethnic Russian party, the Russian Alliance, Tomaszewski has a seat in the European Parliament and finished third in Vilnius’ recent mayoral election. Even Warsaw, which has a longstanding disagreement with Vilnius over the rights of its compatriots in Lithuania, has grasped that Moscow is exploiting the Polish minority to put pressure on the country.

Tomaszewski’s strongly pro-Russian attitudes are a reminder that Moscow’s spies are working hard throughout the region. But the conflict with Putin is not just about Eastern Europe. Moscow’s destruction of the post-Cold War order tests the strength of Western institutions. In Eastern Europe, many look back to Munich 1938, when Western appeasement led to disaster. Though Britain, France and Italy agreed to cede parts of Czechoslovakia to Adolf Hitler’s Germany, it did not forestall war.

“We need to remember,” Alvydas Medalinskas, an analyst at Vilnius’ Mykolas Romeris University told me, “how much Munich increased the aggressor’s appetite.”

Nowhere are the consequences of these mistakes more visible than in the Baltics. Abandoned by the West into Soviet servitude, Lithuania’s long fight for independence has left many unhealed wounds. Today, the Kremlin’s spokesmen and Russian propaganda consistently undermine the sovereignty of the three Baltic countries. Many Russian intellectuals, who before the Maidan revolution had strongly stood up for the Baltics and Ukraine, are nowhere to be heard.

It was not always this way. The solidarity of Russian democrats with Lithuania was an important part of the country’s fight for freedom. Medalinskas remembers banners on Red Square in 1991 that read “Today Vilnius, Tomorrow Moscow.” In 2015, he struggles to find a common language with many of his Russian friends.

One of those Russian democrats in the fight was Boris Nemtsov, shot dead near the Kremlin last month. The threat to the Baltics grows with every day of Moscow’s aggression in Ukraine and sinister clampdown at home. Nobody knows what Putin will do next.

Lithuanians, meanwhile, are preparing for the worst.

http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2015/03/15/lithuania-prepares-for-a-feared-russian-invasion/

Mictian
Mando Supremo
Mando Supremo

Mensajes : 10096
Masculino
Edad : 105
Localización : La Tierra de Dios y de Maria Santisima

Re: Lituania restablece el servicio militar obligatorio

Mensaje por Mictian el 16/3/2015, 8:07 pm

Don Vader escribió:A ver que tan patriotas salen los lituanos.

Rusia no tiene ni que salir a darles en su madre...

Con tan solo unos cuantos movimientos de desestabilización y esos pequeños Paises caerán solitos, sin necesidad de disparar un solo tiro ruso...

Nomas están jugando la parte que les impusieron los gringos de manera que según ellos puedan meter cuña y desestabilizar un posible frente...

La pregunta es... con que??? Jajajajaja


___________________________________
[center]
Hola Invitado. Bienvenido(a) al foro Todo por México.

Recuerda visitar las Reglas del Foro
Si tienes dudas y sugerencias puedes postear en el Buzon
O solicitar asistencia vía Mensaje Privado
        [url=https://twitter.com/#!/Todo_por_Mexico][img]


No te sientas vencido ni aun vencido, no te sientas esclavo siendo esclavo. Tremulo de pavor piensate bravo y arremete feroz ya mal herido!!!. Que muerda y vocifere vengadora, en el polvo ya rodando tu cabeza!!!(Almafuerte).
Desde la creacion de los Ejercitos han existido los exmilitares, pero no existen los exsoldados (Mictian).
Fuiste todo un guerrero mi Max!!! Dios te tenga en su gloria...

ORAI
Teniente
Teniente

Mensajes : 1695
Masculino
Edad : 29
Localización : df

Re: Lituania restablece el servicio militar obligatorio

Mensaje por ORAI el 17/3/2015, 7:20 am

Siento que lo hacen en desesperacion de la situacion en ucrania

Von Leunam
Capitán de Navio
Capitán de Navio

Mensajes : 6530
Masculino
Edad : 28
Localización : Imperial City, Coruscant

Re: Lituania restablece el servicio militar obligatorio

Mensaje por Von Leunam el 18/6/2015, 9:56 pm

Lituania autorizará la presencia militar de EEUU en su territorio



El Gobierno de Lituania planea firmar un acuerdo con Estados Unidos para estrechar la cooperación militar entre ambos países, según revela una nota diplomática entregada a EEUU.

"Los militares estadounidenses, solos o junto con las Fuerzas Armadas del Ejército lituano, podrán hacer uso de la infraestructura y zonas militares", afirma la nota.

Por su parte, una nota estadounidense entregada a Lituania prevé un acuerdo para el libre uso de los campos de entrenamiento en Klaipeda y Pabrade, así como la base de las Fuerzas Aéreas en Siauliai, entre otras instalaciones militares lituanas.

Tras el intercambio de notas diplomáticas, el Gobierno lituano encargó a su Ministerio de Exteriores elaborar el acuerdo, que también prevé fortalecer la cooperación bilateral en materia de defensa, así como la realización de proyectos de construcción en infraestructura militar.

El acuerdo tendrá una duración de dos años e incluye una cláusula que permite la posibilidad de prolongarlo.

En febrero, los ministros de Defensa de países de la OTAN decidieron establecer seis unidades de mando y control en Estonia, Bulgaria, Letonia, Lituania, Polonia y Rumanía para asegurar que las fuerzas de la alianza puedan "actuar de forma unificada desde el inicio" si surge una crisis.

Occidente ha realizado varias olas de ampliación de la OTAN tras el término de la guerra fría, ha desplazado hacia el Este europeo la infraestructura militar de la Alianza y puesto en marcha su proyecto del escudo antimisiles.

Desde principios de junio la OTAN también realiza una serie de maniobras navales en Polonia y los países del Báltico.

Algunos medios de prensa informaron que el Pentágono estudia la posibilidad de desplegar en los países de Europa del Este armas pesadas para contener una "posible agresión rusa" en la región.

EEUU podría establecer en las bases de sus aliados europeos de la OTAN tanques, equipos de combate de infantería y otros tipos de armamentos pesados.

A su vez, la Cancillería rusa alertó a Washington de que su intención de emplazar armas pesadas en Europa del Este torpedea el fundamento de las relaciones entre Rusia y la OTAN.

Lea más en http://mundo.sputniknews.com/seguridad/20150617/1038438679.html#ixzz3dTOL1Y34


Monakyo101
Contraalmirante
Contraalmirante

Mensajes : 7710
Masculino
Edad : 39
Localización : The loone star estate

Re: Lituania restablece el servicio militar obligatorio

Mensaje por Monakyo101 el 18/6/2015, 10:43 pm

No pues se entiende que los lituanos echen sus barbas a remojar, pero por andar de barberos , los rusos les pueden dar cuello.

Contenido patrocinado

Re: Lituania restablece el servicio militar obligatorio

Mensaje por Contenido patrocinado Hoy a las 2:12 am


    Fecha y hora actual: 6/12/2016, 2:12 am