Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este. 5 3.4 36

Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Comparte

Enemigo Público
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya

Mensajes: 6910
Masculino
Edad: 26
Localización: Huaxyacac

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por Enemigo Público el 11/3/2014, 1:16 am

Albert_B escribió:Uf. Que duro.

Rusia difícilmente va a evitar ser el malo del cuento.
Pues desde el principio, los mismos rusos calificaron a Yanukóvich como presidente legítimo, aunque sin futuro político, en otras palabras, no han metido las manos por él, y es por eso que piden que se restaure el proceso democrático en Ucrania.

Takeda
Mayor
Mayor

Mensajes: 5101

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por Takeda el 11/3/2014, 8:18 am

Para Occidente los rusos siempre son los malos del cuento, no tiene nada de raro la nota de El País. Lo sorprendente sería que publicaran alguna entrevista a algún ucraniano simpatizante con Rusia.

Takeda
Mayor
Mayor

Mensajes: 5101

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por Takeda el 11/3/2014, 8:24 am

Ukraine's Increasing Polarization and the Western Challenge


Geopolitical Weekly
TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 2014 - 03:02 Print Text Size
Stratfor
By Eugene Chausovsky

Just days before the Ukrainian crisis broke out, I took an overnight train to Kiev from Sevastopol in Crimea. Three mechanics in their 30s on their way to jobs in Estonia shared my compartment. All ethnic Russians born and raised in Sevastopol, they have made the trip to the Baltic states for the past eight years for seasonal work at Baltic Sea shipyards. Our ride together, accompanied by obligatory rounds of vodka, presented the opportunity for an in-depth discussion of Ukraine's political crisis. The ensuing conversation was perhaps more enlightening than talks of similar length with Ukrainian political, economic or security officials.

My fellow passengers viewed the events at Independence Square in an overwhelmingly negative light. They considered the protesters camped out in Kiev's central square terrorists, completely organized and financed by the United States and the European Union. They did not see the protesters as their fellow countrymen, and they supported then-President Viktor Yanukovich's use of the Berkut security forces to crack down on them. In fact, they were shocked by the Berkut's restraint, saying if it had been up to them, the protests would have been "cleaned up" from the outset. They added that while they usually looked forward to stopping over in Kiev during the long journey to the Baltics, this time they were ashamed of what was happening there and didn't even want to set foot in the city. They also predicted that the situation in Ukraine would worsen before it improved.

A few days later, the protests in Independence Square in fact reached a crescendo of violence. The Berkut closed in on the demonstrators, and subsequent clashes between protesters and security forces throughout the week left dozens dead and hundreds injured. This spawned a sequence of events that led to the overthrow of Yanukovich, the formation of a new Ukrainian government not recognized by Moscow and the subsequent Russian military intervention in Crimea. While the speed of these events astonished many foreign (especially Western) observers, to the men I met on the train, it was all but expected.

After all, the crisis didn't emerge from a vacuum. Ukraine was a polarized country well before the EuroMaidan movement took shape. I have always been struck by how traveling to different parts of Ukraine feels like visiting different countries. Every country has its regional differences, to be sure. But Ukraine stands apart in this regard.

Ukraine's East-West Divide

Traveling in Lviv in the west, for example, is a starkly different experience than traveling in Donetsk in the east. The language spoken is different, with Ukrainian used in Lviv and Russian in Donetsk. The architecture is different, too, with classical European architecture lining narrow cobblestoned streets in Lviv and Soviet apartment blocs alongside sprawling boulevards predominating in Donetsk. Each region has different heroes: A large bust of Lenin surveys the main square in Donetsk, while Stepan Bandera, a World War II-era Ukrainian nationalist revolutionary, is honored in Lviv. Citizens of Lviv commonly view people from Donetsk as pro-Russian rubes while people in Donetsk constantly speak of nationalists/fascists in Lviv.

Lviv and Donetsk lie on the extreme ends of the spectrum, but they are hardly alone. Views are even more polarized on the Crimean Peninsula, where ethnic Russians make up the majority and which soon could cease to be part of Ukraine.

The east-west Ukrainian cultural divide is deep, and unsurprisingly it is reflected in the country's politics. Election results from the past 10 years show a clear dividing line between voting patterns in western and central Ukraine and those in the southern and eastern parts of the country. In the 2005 and 2010 presidential elections, Yanukovich received overwhelming support in the east and Crimea but only marginal support in the west. Ukraine does not have "swing states."

Such internal political and cultural divisions would be difficult to overcome under normal circumstances, but Ukraine's geographic and geopolitical position magnifies them exponentially. Ukraine is the quintessential borderland country, eternally trapped between Europe to the west and Russia to the east. Given its strategic location in the middle of the Eurasian heartland, the country has constantly been -- and will constantly be -- an arena in which the West and Russia duel for influence.

Competition over Ukraine has had two primary effects on the country. The first is to further polarize Ukraine, splitting foreign policy preferences alongside existing cultural divisions. While many in western Ukraine seek closer ties with Europe, many in eastern Ukraine seek closer ties with Russia. While there are those who would avoid foreign entanglements altogether, both the European Union and Russia have made clear that neutrality is not an option. Outside competition in Ukraine has created wild and often destabilizing political swings, especially during the country's post-Soviet independence.

Therefore, the current crisis in Ukraine is only the latest manifestation of competition between the West and Russia. The European Union and the United States greatly influenced the 2004 Orange Revolution in terms of financing and political organization. Russia meanwhile greatly influenced the discrediting of the Orange Regime and the subsequent election of Yanukovich, who lost in the Orange Revolution, in 2010. The West pushed back once more by supporting the EuroMaidan movement after Yanukovich abandoned key EU integration deals, and then Russia countered in Crimea, leading to the current impasse.

The tug of war between Russia and the West over Ukraine has gradually intensified over the past decade. This has hardened positions in Ukraine, culminating in the formation of armed groups representing rival political interests and leading to the violent standoff in Independence Square that quickly spread to other parts of the country.

The current government enjoys Western support, but Moscow and many in eastern and southern Ukraine deny its legitimacy, citing the manner in which it took power. This sets a dangerous precedent because it challenges the sitting government's and any future government's ability to claim any semblance of nationwide legitimacy.

It is clear that Ukraine cannot continue to function for long in its current form. A strong leader in such a polarized society will face major unrest, as Yanukovich's ouster shows. The lack of a national consensus will paralyze the government and prevent officials from forming coherent foreign policy, since any government that strikes a major deal with either Russia or the European Union will find it difficult to rightfully claim it speaks for the majority of the country. Now that Russia has used military moves in Crimea to show it will not let Ukraine go without a fight, the stage has been set for very difficult political negotiations over Ukraine's future.

Russian-Western Conflict Beyond Ukraine

A second, more worrying effect of the competition between the West and Russia over Ukraine extends beyond Ukrainian borders. As competition over the fate of Ukraine has escalated, it has also intensified Western-Russian competition elsewhere in the region.

Georgia and Moldova, two former Soviet countries that have sought stronger ties with the West, have accelerated their attempts to further integrate with the European Union -- and in Georgia's case, with NATO. On the other hand, countries such as Belarus and Armenia have sought to strengthen their economic and security ties with Russia. Countries already strongly integrated with the West like the Baltics are glad to see Western powers stand up to Russia, but meanwhile they know that they could be the next in line in the struggle between Russia and the West. Russia could hit them economically, and Moscow could also offer what it calls protection to their sizable Russian minorities as it did in Crimea. Russia already has hinted at this in discussions to extend Russian citizenship to ethnic Russians and Russian speakers throughout the former Soviet Union.

The major question moving forward is how committed Russia and the West are to backing and reinforcing their positions in these rival blocs. Russia has made clear that it is willing to act militarily to defend its interests in Ukraine. Russia showed the same level of dedication to preventing Georgia from turning to NATO in 2008. Moscow has made no secret that it is willing to use a mixture of economic pressure, energy manipulation and, if need be, military force to prevent the countries on its periphery from leaving the Russian orbit. In the meantime, Russia will seek to intensify integration efforts in its own blocs, including the Customs Union on the economic side and the Collective Security Treaty Organization on the military side.

So the big question is what the West intends. On several occasions, the European Union and United States have proved that they can play a major role in shaping events on the ground in Ukraine. Obtaining EU membership is a stated goal of the governments in Moldova and Georgia, and a significant number of people in Ukraine also support EU membership. But since it has yet to offer sufficient aid or actual membership, the European Union has not demonstrated as serious a commitment to the borderland countries as Russia has. It has refrained from doing so for several reasons, including its own financial troubles and political divisions and its dependence on energy and trade with Russia. While the European Union may yet show stronger resolve as a result of the current Ukrainian crisis, a major shift in the bloc's approach is unlikely -- at least not on its own.

On the Western side, then, U.S. intentions are key. In recent years, the United States has largely stayed on the sidelines in the competition over the Russian periphery. The United States was just as quiet as the European Union was in its reaction to the Russian invasion of Georgia, and calls leading up to the invasion for swiftly integrating Ukraine and Georgia into NATO went largely unanswered. Statements were made, but little was done.

But the global geopolitical climate has changed significantly since 2008. The United States is out of Iraq and is swiftly drawing down its forces in Afghanistan. Washington is now acting more indirectly in the Middle East, using a balance-of-power approach to pursue its interests in the region. This frees up its foreign policy attention, which is significant, given that the United States is the only party with the ability and resources to make a serious push in the Russian periphery.

As the Ukraine crisis moves into the diplomatic realm, a major test of U.S. willingness and ability to truly stand up to Russia is emerging. Certainly, Washington has been quite vocal during the current Ukrainian crisis and has shown signs of getting further involved elsewhere in the region, such as in Poland and the Baltic states. But concrete action from the United States with sufficient backing from the Europeans will be the true test of how committed the West is to standing up to Moscow. Maneuvering around Ukraine's deep divisions and Russian countermoves will be no easy task. But nothing short of concerted efforts by a united Western front will suffice to pull Ukraine and the rest of the borderlands toward the West

Enlace: http://www.stratfor.com/weekly/ukraines-increasing-polarization-and-western-challenge?utm_source=freelist-f&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20140311&utm_term=Gweekly&utm_content=readmore

Albert_B
Terrible Gran Inquisidor
Terrible Gran Inquisidor

Mensajes: 4364
Localización: Tártaro

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por Albert_B el 11/3/2014, 4:24 pm

#EUMÁS SOBRE EL TEMA
Insisten en ser policía del mundo
Los republicanos presionan para que Obama tome una postura más severa contra Putin, pero los estadounidenses piden no intervenir. Mientras tanto, más regiones ucranianas quieren unirse a Rusia

POR PEDRO PABLO CORTÉS - Martes 11 de marzo de 2014
0comentarios




"(Intervenir con militares) sería una clara violación del compromiso de Rusia de respetar la independencia, soberanía y los límites de Ucrania y la ley internacional”
Barack Obama,
Presidente de Estados Unidos
1,000
millones de dólares ofrecerá EU a Ucrania como un paquete de rescate
14%
de los estadounidenses creen que el Gobierno tiene alguna responsabilidad de involucrarse en Ucrania
43%
de la población de EU desaprueba cómo Obama ha lidiado con el conflicto ucraniano
59%
de los ciudadanos de EU preferiría que Washington impusiera sanciones a Moscú
El presidente Barack Obama ha reiterado su apoyo al Gobierno interino de Ucrania para defenderlo de Rusia, algo que los republicanos califican como insuficiente y los estadounidenses tachan de excesivo.

Los ciudadanos estallaron en indignación la semana pasada, cuando la Cámara de Representantes aprobó un paquete de rescate de mil millones de dólares para Ucrania por iniciativa de la Casa Blanca.

“Pueden hacer esto en cinco días, pero no pueden resolver los problemas nacionales. Al parecer la caridad no empieza en casa, sino en la frontera de Rusia y Ucrania”, manifestó a The Huffington Post el lector Joel M.

Apenas 14 por ciento de la población cree que Estados Unidos (EU) tiene “alguna responsabilidad” de involucrarse con Ucrania y solo 18 por ciento piensa que debería defenderlo de una invasión Rusia, revela una encuesta reciente de YouGov.

Un sondeo de CNN muestra que 43 por ciento de los estadounidenses desaprueban cómo Obama ha lidiado con la crisis ucraniana y que el 59 por ciento prefiere que Washington imponga sanciones económicas a Moscú.

Incluso, hay republicanos destacados que secundan el clamor de la ciudadanía, como el excandidato presidencial y exlegislador Ron Paul.

“Estaría bien si tomáramos en cuenta a los ucranianos. Es su revuelta civil y decidir quién dirigirá su país debería ser cuestión de ellos. Desafortunadamente otros se involucran y a EU le parece irresistible involucrarse”, declaró el también exmilitar a la agencia RT.

Acusan debilidad de Obama

La mayoría de los republicanos aseguran que la débil política exterior de Obama propició que el presidente ruso Vladimir Putin pudiese invadir a Ucrania.

Pese a las declaraciones y las sanciones económicas y diplomáticas impuestas contra Moscú, los conservadores creen que Obama no inspira fortaleza.

“Cada vez que el presidente aparece en televisión y amenaza a Putin, o a alguien similar, todos tuercen los ojos, incluyendo la mía. Tenemos un mandatario débil e indeciso que invita a la agresión”, dijo a CNN la senadora Lindsey Graham.

Inclusive, culpan al presidente estadounidense de no reforzar el comercio de gas natural con Europa para que la Unión Europea pudiese también confrontar con más fuerza a Rusia.

“Esto no debería requerir acciones militares. Nadie en EU quiere esto, pero requiere otras acciones y liderazgo, lo que desafortunadamente le falta al presidente Obama”, escribió para Time Rand Paul, favorito para contender por la presidencia.

En contraste, los opositores del intervencionismo argumentan que la imagen de fortaleza de un mandatario es irrelevante, pues el expresidente George W. Bush no evitó que Putin invadiera Georgia en 2008.

“Nada de esto justifica una agresión de Putin, pero si vamos a encontrar una solución política a la crisis de Ucrania, debemos admitir que lo que está en juego no es personal y va más allá de la supuesta debilidad de Obama”, indicó el analista Fareed Zakaria.

Crece influencia de Putin

Con el referéndum que se celebrará el próximo domingo, la península de Crimea estaría más cerca de dejar a Ucrania para unirse a Rusia.

Este caso ha inspirado a otros regiones ucranianas para exigir su propia consulta, como el norteste del país, donde provincias como Lugansk tienen una gran población de origen ruso.

Los ciudadanos de Luganks, donde el 68 por ciento de los habitantes son de origen ruso, exigen tener un referéndum similar al de Crimea, lo que podría inspirar a al menos otras cuatro provincias a hacer lo mismo, expresó ayer el analista Rodrigo Fernández.

“La pregunta clave es ahora qué pasará con las otras provincias ucranias que tienen un alto porcentaje de población rusohablante. ¿Seguirán algunas el ejemplo crimeo? Y si lo hacen, ¿Cuál será la posición del Kremlin ante ello?”, escribió en El País.

“Las autoridades de Kiev pueden insistir en tratar de imponerse sin tener en cuenta los ánimos de la población de esas regiones o pueden elegir una vía democrática que pasaría por elecciones directas de las autoridades provinciales”, añadió Fernández.

Contrastes de la confrontación

"Esto parece familiar, es lo que Hitler hizo en los 30. Todos los alemanes que eran de etnia alemana, los alemanes que estaban en lugares como Checoslovaquia y Romania, Hitler decía que no los trataban bien”
> Hillary Clinton, ex secretaria de Estado de EU

"Los Estados Unidos deben restaurar su posición en la comunidad internacional, que se ha erosionado al extender demasiadas manos de amistad a nuestros adversarios, incluso a expensar de nuestros amigos"
> Condolezza Rice, ex secretaria de Estado de EU

"Todos somos ucranianos (…) Putin cree que esto es un juego de ajedrez que recuerda a la Guerra Fría y necesitamos darnos cuenta de eso y actuar conforme a ello”
> John McCain, senador republicano de Arizona

http://www.reporteindigo.com/reporte/mundo/insisten-en-ser-policia-del-mundo


Última edición por Albert_B el 11/3/2014, 5:01 pm, editado 1 vez


___________________________________
¡No eres completamente inútil, sirves de mal ejemplo!
"El día que se inventaron las excusas se acabaron los pendejos."
"Una vida que no puede someterse a examen, no merece vivirla" Sócrates
"Sólo el día que el último rey sea colgado de las tripas del último cura el hombre será realmente libre"

chapulincolorado
2/o Maestre
2/o Maestre

Mensajes: 434
Masculino
Edad: 24

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por chapulincolorado el 11/3/2014, 4:26 pm

Para Occidente los rusos siempre son los malos del cuento, no tiene nada de raro la nota de El País. Lo sorprendente sería que publicaran alguna entrevista a algún ucraniano simpatizante con Rusia.

en la relacion rusia-ucrania esto no es gratuito, tan es asi que en la 2a guerra mundial ucrania prefirio aliarse a los alemanes que a rusia. la historia ha dado la razon ya que los rusos dejaron a su paso hacia alemania un rastro de desmanes, violaciones, arrestos, deportaciones a siberia, etc.

les recomiendo la serie los hijos del tercer reich.

Enemigo Público
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya

Mensajes: 6910
Masculino
Edad: 26
Localización: Huaxyacac

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por Enemigo Público el 11/3/2014, 4:47 pm

chapulincolorado escribió:
Para Occidente los rusos siempre son los malos del cuento, no tiene nada de raro la nota de El País. Lo sorprendente sería que publicaran alguna entrevista a algún ucraniano simpatizante con Rusia.

en la relacion rusia-ucrania esto no es gratuito, tan es asi que en la 2a guerra mundial ucrania prefirio aliarse a los alemanes que a rusia. la historia ha dado la razon ya que los rusos dejaron a su paso hacia alemania un rastro de desmanes, violaciones, arrestos, deportaciones a siberia, etc.

les recomiendo la serie los hijos del tercer reich.
No confundamos Rusia con la Unión Soviética, donde recordemos, que Stalin no era ruso, era Georgiano.

Y ni toda "Ucrania" se unió a Alemania, ni Ucrania existía como tal, a decir verdad en ese tiempo el conflicto fue mas de origen étnico que político.

NITRO
Teniente

Mensajes: 1263
Masculino
Edad: 33
Localización: En algun lugar

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por NITRO el 11/3/2014, 5:13 pm

Bueno, más fotos sobre los movimientos rusos y ucranianos en el campo:

Movimiento de material ruso a las zonas cercanas a la frontera con Ucrania:



Mientras tanto en Crimea:



Los movimientos ucranianos:


Rostov del Don, Rusia:






Da svidaniya!

chapulincolorado
2/o Maestre
2/o Maestre

Mensajes: 434
Masculino
Edad: 24

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por chapulincolorado el 11/3/2014, 5:14 pm

por eso lo comento enemigo, al final lo etnico hara la diferencia, los ucranianos tienen muchos rencores guardados hacia los rusos o sovieticos. a lo mejor al final ucrania podria perder un 30% de su territorio, pero que rusia intente tomar el resto seria suicida.

NITRO
Teniente

Mensajes: 1263
Masculino
Edad: 33
Localización: En algun lugar

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por NITRO el 11/3/2014, 5:16 pm

Tanques en Rostov del Don:



Da svidaniya!

Enemigo Público
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya

Mensajes: 6910
Masculino
Edad: 26
Localización: Huaxyacac

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por Enemigo Público el 11/3/2014, 5:34 pm

chapulincolorado escribió:por eso lo comento enemigo, al final lo etnico hara la diferencia, los ucranianos tienen muchos rencores guardados hacia los rusos o sovieticos. a lo mejor al final ucrania podria perder un 30% de su territorio, pero que rusia intente tomar el resto seria suicida.
Uno de los motivos de las acciones de los soldados soviéticos, que no se justifican aunque se entiende el contexto, fue debido al exterminio masivo en Ucrania de rusos, judíos, gitanos, entre otros grupos étnicos(incluso algunos ucranianos) por parte de los nazis y sus aliados ucranianos, desatándose una venganza al retomar el control del territorio.

No hay acciones sin consecuencia y los soviéticos fueron en extremo vengativos ante las vejaciones sufridas por las fuerzas germanas y aliados.

Yo no veo el porque Rusia podría intentar tomar el territorio completo, ya que incluso, considerando el factor económico, le favorece más impulsar el separatismo de Ucrania Sur-Oriental, donde de encuentra la mayoría de los complejos industriales de Ucrania.
Rusia no es USA, no va a cometer sus mismos errores de tomar un país que le es hostil.

Enemigo Público
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya

Mensajes: 6910
Masculino
Edad: 26
Localización: Huaxyacac

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por Enemigo Público el 11/3/2014, 7:28 pm


Enemigo Público
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya

Mensajes: 6910
Masculino
Edad: 26
Localización: Huaxyacac

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por Enemigo Público el 11/3/2014, 7:34 pm

Moscú reconocerá los resultados del referéndum en Crimea

19:52 11/03/2014
Moscú, 11 de marzo, RIA Novosti.


El Ministerio de Exteriores de Rusia estimó que la decisión del Parlamento de Crimea de proclamar la independencia es legítima e indicó que reconocerá los resultados del referéndum en la República Autónoma.
“La Federación Rusa respetará los resultados de la libre manifestación de la voluntad de los pueblos de Crimea”, dice el comunicado.
El texto señala que en caso de un resultado positivo en el referéndum Crimea se dirigirá a la Federación Rusa solicitando su adhesión.
Exteriores subrayó también que el Parlamento de Crimea declaró este martes que la península será “un Estado democrático, laico y plurinacional que se compromete a respaldar la paz y el consenso internacional e interconfesional en su territorio”.


http://sp.ria.ru/neighbor_relations/20140311/159509365.html

Enemigo Público
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya

Mensajes: 6910
Masculino
Edad: 26
Localización: Huaxyacac

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por Enemigo Público el 11/3/2014, 7:39 pm

El Parlamento de Ucrania amenaza con cesar los poderes de la Asamblea de Crimea

20:34 11/03/2014
Moscú, 11 de marzo, RIA Novosti.


La Rada Suprema ucraniana amenazó con anular los poderes del Parlamento de Crimea en un comunicado publicado en su página web.
“La Rada Suprema exige del Parlamento de la República Autónoma de Crimea reconsiderar inmediatamente su decisión del 6 de marzo para que corresponda a las Constituciones de Ucrania y de Crimea. Si esta decisión no se lleva a cabo, la Rada Suprema considerará un cese anticipado de los poderes del Parlamento de Crimea”, dice el documento.
El 6 de marzo el Parlamento de Crimea votó por entrar en la Federación Rusa y convocó un referéndum para el 16 de marzo. Los crimeos deberán contestar a dos preguntas: ¿se pronuncia por la reunificación de Crimea con Rusia como entidad federal?, ¿se pronuncia por restablecer la Constitución de la República de Crimea de 1992 y el estatus de Crimea como parte de Ucrania?
Este martes, 11 de marzo, el Parlamento de Crimea aprobó una declaración que respalda la independencia de la región de Ucrania y proclama su intención de adherirse a Rusia. Los legisladores de Sebastopol apoyaron el documento.
El texto indica que la decisión “se basa en el Estatuto de la ONU y varios otros documentos internacionales que establecen el derecho de un pueblo a la autodeterminación así como tomando en consideración que la Corte de Justicia de Naciones Unidas el 22 de julio de 2010 declaró con respecto a Kosovo que la proclamación unilateral de independencia de una región no infringe el derecho internacional”.
Si los crimeos votan en el referéndum por adherirse a Rusia, Crimea primero se proclamará Estado independiente.


http://sp.ria.ru/international/20140311/159507271.html


Bulgaria, Rumania y EEUU aplazan maniobras navales conjuntas en el mar Negro

21:31 11/03/2014
Moscú, 11 de marzo, RIA Novosti.


El mal tiempo ha obligado a aplazar un día las maniobras navales conjuntas de Bulgaria, Rumania y EEUU en el mar Negro, comunicó hoy el Ministerio búlgaro de Defensa.
El simulacro de seguridad debía comenzar este martes en las aguas territoriales de Rumania, con la participación de una fragata búlgara, tres buques rumanos y el destructor estadounidense USS Truxtun.
El destructor forma parte del grupo naval encabezado por el portaviones USS George H.W. Bush, que opera en la zona de responsabilidad de la Sexta Flota de EEUU.
El USS Truxtun está equipado con el sistema de defensa antimisiles Aegis y asimismo lleva misiles de crucero Tomahawk.
La Armada estadounidense informó que las maniobras fueron planificadas mucho antes de producirse la crisis ucraniana.


http://sp.ria.ru/Defensa/20140311/159507588.html

Enemigo Público
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya

Mensajes: 6910
Masculino
Edad: 26
Localización: Huaxyacac

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por Enemigo Público el 11/3/2014, 7:44 pm

Las reservas de oro y de divisas de Ucrania se agotarán en menos de dos meses

22:10 11/03/2014
Moscú, 11 de marzo, RIA Novosti.


El ministro de Finanzas ucraniano Alexandr Shlapak estimó en una entrevista con la radio Eco de Moscú que Ucrania se quedará sin oro y divisas dentro de dos meses.
“La recesión de la economía dura ya dos años, tenemos una grande deuda pública. El Tesoro está casi vacío. Las reservas de oro y de divisas de Ucrania se agotarán en menos de dos meses”, señaló.
También indicó que Ucrania tiene saldo comercial negativo y advirtió que se debe corregir a la vez con la reducción de la deuda.
“Solo de esta manera podremos conseguir un desarrollo sostenible y prometer a nuestros acreedores, incluida Rusia, que les devolveremos el dinero”, recalcó.
A finales del año pasado el Gobierno de Rusia decidió conceder un préstamo de 15.000 millones de dólares a Ucrania. En diciembre Kiev recibió el primer tramo de 3.000 millones de dólares.
El presidente de Rusia, Vladímir Putin, declaró que Rusia está dispuesta a considerar la asignación de los futuros tramos pero los países occidentales piden no hacerlo insistiendo en un trabajo conjunto con el FMI.


http://sp.ria.ru/international/20140311/159507868.html


La legislación de EEUU prohíbe prestar ayuda al nuevo Gobierno de Ucrania

22:20 11/03/2014
Moscú, 11 de marzo, RIA Novosti.


Moscú recomendó este martes a Washington pensar en las consecuencias de su apoyo incondicional a los radicales en Ucrania al recordar que las leyes estadounidenses prohíben otorgar ayuda al nuevo Gobierno en Kiev.
Las enmiendas introducidas en la Ley de 1961 sobre la Asistencia Extranjera prohíben a EEUU proporcionar ayuda financiera al Gobierno de un país cuyo presidente legítimo haya sido apartado mediante un golpe de Estado o por otra vía ilegal, recordó el Ministerio ruso de Asuntos Exteriores.
Por consiguiente, el plan de conceder mil millones de dólares a las nuevas autoridades en Kiev “no se enmarca en el sistema legal estadounidense”, señala un comentario publicado en la web de la cancillería.
Exteriores considera que la Administración de Obama “seguirá haciendo la vista gorda ante el dominio de las fuerzas ultranacionalistas en Kiev que han organizado en todo el país la caza de disidentes, aumentan la presión sobre la comunidad rusoparlante y amenaza con represalias a los habitantes de Crimea por su deseo de autodeterminación”.
“Quienes toman las decisiones en EEUU deberían pensar en las consecuencias de inyecciones financieras y apoyo incondicional a los elementos radicales de corte nazi en Ucrania”, advierte el comentario.


http://sp.ria.ru/international/20140311/159510124.html


Lo último que Ucrania debiera hacer es aceptar tratos con el FMI, aquí en México y Latinoamérica ya sabemos por amarga experiencia como termina eso.

Enemigo Público
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya

Mensajes: 6910
Masculino
Edad: 26
Localización: Huaxyacac

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por Enemigo Público el 11/3/2014, 7:49 pm

Moscú pide a la OSCE una evaluación imparcial de la libertad de prensa en Ucrania

20:05 11/03/2014
Moscú, 11 de marzo, RIA Novosti.


Rusia insistió hoy en que la Organización para la Seguridad y la Cooperación en Europa (OSCE) haga “una evaluación rápida e imparcial” de las violaciones de la libertad de prensa en Ucrania y calificó de inadmisible la política de doble rasero en esta materia.
Un comentario publicado en la web de la cancillería rusa expresa la preocupación de Moscú ante la “restricción de la libertad mediática y violaciones de los derechos de periodistas que cubren los acontecimientos en Ucrania”.
Exteriores recordó que los sitios web de varios medios rusos, como la televisión RT y el diario Rossiyskaya Gazeta, sufrieron recientemente ataques informáticos a causa de su cobertura de la crisis de Ucrania.
También mencionó las amenazas al corresponsal de la televisión Rossiya 24, Artiom Kol, por cuya cabeza se ofreció una recompensa de 10.000 grivnas en Ucrania.
Algunos periodistas rusos, como un equipo de la cadena TV Tsentr, fueron deportados a su llegada a Ucrania; a varios otros se les denegó la entrada bajo diversos pretextos.
El pasado 4 de marzo, tres cadenas rusas fueron excluidas de los programas de televisión por cable en Ucrania.
Hoy, el organismo ucraniano de radio y televisión exigió que los proveedores dejen de retransmitir las señales de las cadenas rusas Vesti, Rossiya 24, ORT, RTR, Planeta y NTV-Mir.
La representante de la OSCE para la libertad de los medios, Dunja Mijatovic, exhortó esta tarde al Gobierno de Ucrania a no cesar la transmisión de las cadenas de televisión rusas, al advertir que sería “una forma de censura”. “Las razones de seguridad nacional no deben menoscabar la libertad de prensa”, declaró.


http://sp.ria.ru/international/20140311/159509517.html


Crimea prohíbe los partidos nacionalistas Svoboda y Pravy Sektor



22:58 11/03/2014
Simferópol, 11 de marzo, RIA Novosti.


El Parlamento de Crimea prohibió hoy la labor de varias organizaciones nacionalistas, entre ellas Svoboda (Libertad) y Pravy Sektor (Sector de Derecha) en el territorio de esta península, actualmente república autónoma en el seno de Ucrania.
La prohibición, que el Parlamento justificó por el peligro que dichos grupos implican para la población de Crimea, se extiende también a las formaciones que integran Pravy Sektor: Trizub, UNA-UNSO, Karpatska Sech y otras.
“Las autoridades de la República Autónoma de Crimea hacen lo posible por impedir la entrada de extremistas en su territorio”, consta en una nota adjunta al anteproyecto de la resolución correspondiente.
El Parlamento encomendó al Servicio de Seguridad de Crimea “tomar las medidas necesarias para descubrir y llevar al juicio a cuantos incitan a la hostilidad étnica y la violencia”, y al Ministerio de Justicia, no registrar las delegaciones de partidos y ONG profascistas y neonazis.
Las autoridades de Crimea planean celebrar el 16 de marzo un referéndum para decidir, si la república permanece en el seno de Ucrania o se incorpora a la Federación Rusa.


http://sp.ria.ru/international/20140311/159508151.html

Enemigo Público
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya

Mensajes: 6910
Masculino
Edad: 26
Localización: Huaxyacac

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por Enemigo Público el 11/3/2014, 8:20 pm

Aviones de la OTAN comienzan a patrullar el cielo de Rumania

22:45 11/03/2014
Moscú, 11 de marzo, RIA Novosti.


Los aviones AWACS de la OTAN comenzarán a patrullar a partir de hoy el espacio aéreo de Rumania, informó la prensa internacional que cita el Ministerio rumano de Defensa.
La decisión de vigilar el cielo de Polonia y Rumania fue tomada ayer tras una reunión del Consejo de la OTAN. Los AWACS despegarán desde sus bases de Geilenkirchen (Alemania) y Waddington (Inglaterra) y sobrevolarán sólo el territorio de los países aliados.
Polonia y Rumania, miembros de la OTAN desde 1999 y 2004, respectivamente, son los vecinos occidentales de Ucrania. La frontera ucraniano-polaca mide 542 kilómetros y la ucraniano-rumana, 613 kilómetros.
El 4 de marzo, la OTAN celebró una reunión dedicada a los acontecimientos en Ucrania y anunció que incrementará más del doble los cazas que patrullan el espacio aéreo en la zona del Báltico.
Al día siguiente, 5 de marzo, el secretario general de la OTAN, Anders Fogh Rasmussen, declaró que la Alianza revisará los lazos con Moscú debido a su posición sobre Ucrania.

http://sp.ria.ru/international/20140311/159508422.html

Motul Ajaw
Sargento Segundo 2/o
Sargento Segundo 2/o

Mensajes: 360
Masculino
Edad: 26
Localización: Chiapas de mi corazón.

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por Motul Ajaw el 11/3/2014, 8:28 pm

Aunque la OTAN y EU relinchen y de de patadas dudo que los rusos suelten lo que ya tomaron. Además Crimea se la pusieron en bandeja de plata los mismos occidentales.

Son puras patadas de ahogado. El desplege es por las actividades de unidades rusas en Kaliningrado.

Takeda
Mayor
Mayor

Mensajes: 5101

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por Takeda el 12/3/2014, 9:54 am

Bajo la Lupa

Ucrania: del fracking del shale gas de Chevron al “fracking geopolítico” de Putin

Alfredo Jalife-Rahme


El ominoso fracking (fractura hidráulica) –que practica Estados Unidos para la explotación desregulada del shale gas (esquisto/lutita/grisú)– se tornó geopolítico en Ucrania.

El fracking de Ucrania, es decir, su explotación del shale gas por Chevron y Shell, desencadenó delicados eventos en la frontera con Rusia susceptibles de desembocar en la fractura geopolítica del nuevo gobierno fondomonetarista instalado en Kiev, de acuerdo con los designios grabados de Victoria Noland, asistente del Departamento de Estado (ver Bajo la Lupa, 5 y 9/3/14).

Estrategas de Estados Unidos de proclividad superbélica sentencian sin antítesis que el talón de Aquiles de Rusia, en la era del zar geoenergético global Vlady Putin, son sus reservas energéticas: en particular, su gas natural (nota: Rusia es la primera reserva del mundo antes de Irán, Qatar y Turkmenistán), que puede ser desplazado por Estados Unidos, la supuesta nueva Arabia Saudita del siglo XXI, gracias a su tecnología controvertida del fracking.

Mucho antes del golpe fondomonetarista en Kiev –que perturbadoramente sacrificó a sus civiles por los francotiradores neonazis, según una charla filtrada entre el ministro de Relaciones Exteriores de Estonia y su homóloga de la Unión Europea (UE) –, el fallido trapecista y depuesto saltimbanqui, el presidente Yanukovich, había concretado dos polémicos acuerdos con las petroleras anglosajonas Chevron y Shell para la explotación del controvertido shale gas en Ucrania.

Lo que no entendió el cándido Yanukovich, hoy refugiado humillantemente en Rusia después de sus erráticos malabarismos –entre Estados Unidos, UE y Rusia–, es que los presidentes son desechables para las trasnacionales anglosajonas, como se ha demostrado fehacientemente desde su existencia.

The New York Times (6/11/13) cacarea el mismo mantra sobre la revolución energética encabezada por Estados Unidos: “las tecnologías del shale gas están alterando la geopolítica energética desde Rusia hasta el Medio Oriente. Tres territorios –Rusia, Irán y Qatar– detentan casi la mitad de las reservas convencionales de gas natural”.

A regañadientes, The New York Times cita el cese del fracking en Rumania por Chevron debido a las protestas locales, cuyos contestatarios, a mi juicio, no desean ser envenenados.

No faltan los ditirambos desregulados de los panegiristas del shale gas como el infatuado Christopher Helman, de la revista Forbes, quien proclama: Me encuentro en Houston, Texas, la capital energética del mundo (¡supersic!) y sentencia que “lo que Ucrania necesita es una revolución del shale gas al estilo de Estados Unidos”.

Christopher Helman diagnostica sin tapujos que el gas natural fue el origen de la crisis en Ucrania .

Tanto el líder camaral del Partido Republicano, John Boehner, como el funcionario del Departamento de Estado y anterior embajador en Ucrania (sic) y México, el cubano-estadunidense Carlos Pascual, alientan a que Obama apruebe la exportación del gas natural de Estados Unidos con el fin de requilibrar el mercado gasero global.

Condy Rice, ex asesora de Seguridad Nacional de Baby Bush y ejecutiva de Chevron –que se despachó con la cuchara grande en el “México neoliberal itamita” – exulta la abundancia de petróleo y gas de Norteamérica (¡supersic!), que empantanará la capacidad de Moscú (WP, 7/3/14).

En contrapunto, hasta Stratfor (7/3/14) admite que la fuerza de Rusia como exportador de energía no será amenazada por un aumento en las exportaciones de gas natural de Estados Unidos, limitado en su habilidad para desplegar estratégicamente sus propias exportaciones de energía con propósitos geopolíticos.

Tim Boersma, becario de la Iniciativa de Seguridad Energética de la Brookings Institution, advirtió que no existen soluciones rápidas y sencillas al dominio de energía que ha establecido Rusia en Ucrania.

Durante la aciaga etapa cleptomaniaca del defenestrado Yanukovich, Ucrania firmó un acuerdo con Shell para la exploración del shale gas en el campo de Yuzivska, en la provincia de Donetsk (de mayoría rusófila), puesta en jaque por Vlady Putin .

Shell había completado la exploración de su primer pozo en la región de Kharkiv (la parte rusófila) bajo el doble fracking: geológico y geopolítico.

La codicia de las petroleras anglosajonas no tiene límite y ExxonMobil contempla(ba) explorar las aguas profundas (sic) de la parte occidental del superestratégico Mar Negro (el yacimiento de Odessa).

Tanto las perforaciones de Shell, en la parte rusófila de Ucrania, como en el Mar Negro, han sido puestas en riesgo por el posicionamiento de Rusia en Crimea.

Pese al repudio generalizado al fracking geológico en prácticamente toda Europa, 109 días antes de la defenestración de Yanukovich por los francotiradores neonazis del Occidente fondomonetarista, Chevron firmó un acuerdo de 50 años (¡supersic!) para desarrollar la parte occidental eurófila (el bloque Oleska: pletórico en shale gas), cuya inversión total alcanzaría 10 mil millones de dólares.

¿Llevó el fracking geológico de las gaseras anglosajonas en Ucrania a su fracking geopolítico?

Yanukovich exultaba en su portal el acuerdo con Chevron –que acabó arrojándolo al basurero de la historia–, que “colmará las necesidades de gas de Ucrania (…) que exportará sus recursos energéticos en 2020”. ¡Vaya candidez!

Según BP, en 2012 Ucrania consumió cerca de 50 mil millones de metros cúbicos de gas natural, en su mayoría importado de Rusia, mientras produce 19 mil millones de metros cúbicos.

El escritor crítico Mike Whitney considera que Brzezinski dirige las estrategias de guerra desde las sombras y aduce que lo que sucede en el Cáucaso y en Ucrania tiene como objetivo el petróleo: “Todo es sobre el petróleo. Petróleo y poder. Las ambiciones imperiales de Estados Unidos son cuidadosamente marinadas en petróleo, acceso al petróleo y control del petróleo. Sin petróleo no existe imperio, ni hegemonía del dólar (…) El petróleo es la moneda del reino, la vía hacia el dominio global”, mientras Putin tiene la audacia (sic) de pensar que el petróleo en el suelo ruso pertenece a Rusia .

Con razón la prensa china asienta que actualmente Putin es el único mandatario en el mundo que se ha atrevido a detener el irredentismo petrolero de Estados Unidos.

alfredojalife.com

Twitter: @AlfredoJalife

Facebook: AlfredoJalife

Albert_B
Terrible Gran Inquisidor
Terrible Gran Inquisidor

Mensajes: 4364
Localización: Tártaro

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por Albert_B el 12/3/2014, 10:14 am

Crimea busca la independencia como paso para unirse a Rusia

El Parlamento invoca el modelo de Kosovo, que se escindió de Serbia en 2008
Pilar Bonet Simferópol 11 MAR 2014 - 20:43 CET153  


Fuerzas prorrusas examinan a un grupo de hombres, el lunes en el puesto de control en Chongar, en la entrada a Crimea. / ALISA BOROVIKOVA (AFP)

Guardar  Las autoridades separatistas de Crimea alteraron el martes sobre la marcha el guion con el que buscan legitimar su futura incorporación a Rusia y, para ello, aprobaron una declaración de independencia unilateral, invocando el modelo de Kosovo, que en febrero de 2008 se autoproclamó independiente de Serbia.

La decisión, tomada por el Soviet Supremo de Crimea (Parlamento) en una sesión extraordinaria secreta y a puerta cerrada, parece ser el resultado de un plan coordinado desde Moscú para evitar que el Kremlin pueda ser acusado de anexión si incorpora a Crimea (una república autónoma perteneciente a Ucrania), a su territorio inmediatamente después del referéndum del 16 de marzo. En Ucrania los referendos locales son ilegales.

Antes de que el Parlamento de Crimea tomara la decisión, el cambio de guion quedó patente en Moscú por la mañana cuando el vicejefe de la Duma Estatal (Cámara baja del Parlamento ruso), Serguéi Zhelesniak, del partido gubernamental Rusia Unida, manifestó que no era necesario aprobar la ley (recientemente admitida a trámite) para regular la incorporación de nuevos territorios a Rusia. “Desde el punto de vista de la Constitución y la legislación vigente de la Federación Rusa no hay ningún obstáculo para incorporar parte del territorio de otros Estados como nuevo sujeto de Rusia”, manifestó Zhelesniak tras reunirse con los dirigentes de su grupo parlamentario.

El proyecto de ley admitido a trámite en la Duma ha despertado gran suspicacia en países aliados de Rusia, como Kazajistán, que tiene una considerable población rusa al norte de su territorio. Zhelesniak dijo el martes que cualquier proyecto de ley para “optimizar” el proceso de incorporación de nuevos sujetos a Rusia tiene que ser examinado “de forma concienzuda y profesional” por los comités competentes. Ninguno de los países de la CEI (el grupo de Estados postsoviéticos aliados con Rusia) apoya el referéndum de Crimea. Los únicos observadores que acudirán a él son los mismos rusos. En las calles de Simferópol y las carreteras de Crimea puede verse ya la publicidad del plebiscito, para el que se imprimen cerca de 1,8 millones de papeletas, según la comisión electoral local.

En el referéndum se formulan dos preguntas a los crimeos, a saber si quieren incorporarse a Rusia o si quieren seguir siendo parte de Ucrania. Pero la declaración de independencia del martes distorsiona este planteamiento, al introducir una etapa de supuesto territorio independiente en el camino entre Ucrania y Rusia, algo así como una etapa intermedia destinada a blanquear una transacción fraudulenta.

A favor de la declaración de independencia de Crimea votaron 78 diputados, según el centro de prensa del Soviet Supremo. En una nota de este departamento se informa de que, en caso de resultado positivo, de “la consulta de la voluntad popular sobre la incorporación de Crimea (República Autónoma de Crimea y Sebastopol), Crimea después del referéndum se declarará un país independiente y soberano con una forma de gobierno republicana”. La decisión, se dice en la nota de prensa, se tomó partiendo de los estatutos de la ONU y otros documentos internacionales que fijan el derecho de los pueblos a la autodeterminación y considerando la decisión del Tribunal Internacional de la ONU sobre Kosovo del 22 de julio de 2010.

En tanto que “Estado independiente y soberano”, Crimea “se dirigirá a la Federación Rusa” para ser aceptada “sobre la base del correspondiente tratado internacional en el conjunto de la Federación Rusa y en calidad de nuevo sujeto (unidad administrativa) de la Federación Rusa”.

El 4 de marzo, el presidente de Rusia, Vladímir Putin, se manifestó a favor del derecho de las naciones a la autodeterminación y citó el caso de Kosovo. “Si se permitió hacerlo, supongamos, a los kosovares y los albaneses de Kosovo, si se permitió hacerlo a muchas partes del mundo, nadie ha cambiado ese derecho de la nación a la autodeterminación, fundamentado en correspondientes documentos de la ONU”, dijo Putin, según el cual solo los ciudadanos residentes en los territorios que se autodeterminan tienen derecho a decidir su destino. Rusia no ha reconocido a Kosovo, que declaró su independencia unilateral en febrero de 2008.

El Parlamento de Crimea tomó el martes también decisiones para seducir a la población tártara local. En concreto, decidió que el tártaro será idioma cooficial en Crimea, que los tártaros tendrán cuotas de representación del 20% en los órganos políticos (en Rusia las cuotas de minorías nacionales no están previstas) y también aprobó un plan de ayuda a los tártaros para cinco años. Por otra parte, Mustafá Dzhemilev, ex jefe del Medzhlis (consejo u órgano de representación de la comunidad, paralelo a las instituciones oficiales) de los tártaros de Crimea, viajó a Moscú para entrevistarse con Putin. Dzhemilev ha sido invitado por Mintimer Shaimiev, expresidente del territorio de Tatarstán (unidad administrativa rusa donde hay una mayoría tártara). Las nuevas autoridades de Kiev han dado el visto bueno al viaje de Dzhemilev a Moscú.

http://internacional.elpais.com/internacional/2014/03/11/actualidad/1394566985_613155.html

Excelentes aritilugios legales. cuando tengan que ser declarados nación independiente nada los detendrá. Se ha visto pocas veces anexiones pacíficas de estados.


___________________________________
¡No eres completamente inútil, sirves de mal ejemplo!
"El día que se inventaron las excusas se acabaron los pendejos."
"Una vida que no puede someterse a examen, no merece vivirla" Sócrates
"Sólo el día que el último rey sea colgado de las tripas del último cura el hombre será realmente libre"

Albert_B
Terrible Gran Inquisidor
Terrible Gran Inquisidor

Mensajes: 4364
Localización: Tártaro

Re: Ucrania destituye al presidente Yanukovich. Rusia anexa la Peninsula de Crimea, separatistas armados atacan en el Este.

Mensaje por Albert_B el 12/3/2014, 10:19 am

El G7 amenaza a Rusia con represalias si anexiona a Crimea

El grupo exige a Moscú que ceje en todas sus maniobras para permitir un cambio de estatus de la península de Ucrania


Un soldado sin insignias desplegado en el operativo militar que rodea la base ucraniana de
Perevalnoye, en Crimea. / YURI KOCHETKOV (EFE)

Guardar Los líderes del G7 requirieron el martes a Rusia que detenga "todos sus esfuerzos para cambiar el estatus de Crimea". En caso contrario, prometieron tomar represalias. Las siete potencias económicas (Alemania, Canadá, Estados Unidos, Francia, Italia, Japón y Reino Unido) reclamaron a Moscú que retire sus tropas de Ucrania, permita la entrada de observadores internacionales en Crimea y que entable negociaciones con las nuevas autoridades de Kiev.

"Además de sus consecuencias sobre la unidad, soberanía e integridad territorial de Ucrania, la anexión de Crimea tendría graves implicaciones para el orden legal internacional", señalaron los líderes, en un comunicado publicado por la Casa Blanca.

"Si Rusia diera semejante paso [la anexión], emprenderemos nuevas acciones, individual y colectivamente", advirtió el comunicado.

El G7 considera que el referéndum convocado para este domingo en Crimea sobre la integración con Rusia "no tendría efectos legales" ni morales.

El presidente de EE UU, Barack Obama, tiene previsto reunirse hoy con el primer ministro interino de Ucrania, Arseni Yatseniuk.
http://internacional.elpais.com/internacional/2014/03/12/actualidad/1394631068_105392.html


___________________________________
¡No eres completamente inútil, sirves de mal ejemplo!
"El día que se inventaron las excusas se acabaron los pendejos."
"Una vida que no puede someterse a examen, no merece vivirla" Sócrates
"Sólo el día que el último rey sea colgado de las tripas del último cura el hombre será realmente libre"

    Fecha y hora actual: 31/7/2014, 10:31 am