Este es un foro dedicado a las Fuerzas Armadas Mexicanas así como de los diferentes Cuerpos de Policía y demás entes que se dedican a la Seguridad interna de México.


Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Comparte

Rogersukoi27
Almirante
Almirante

Mensajes : 9945
Masculino
Edad : 58

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 7/3/2015, 1:34 pm

Con la emocion de celebrar la relacion comercial de CHINA  con los BRIC´s,  ahora los
militares de la INDIA,  contemplan como contrario a su clara posicion en el Mar Indico,
donde los Chinos han establecido (Empresa de logistica China del Gobierno) posicion
estrategica en Colombo, Sri Lanka, que permite la recepcion de los submarinos Chinos
en dicha base, aunque no se ha reconocido oficialmente como tal.
 El Estratega Chino Almirante Liu Huaqing,  desde 1982, establecio el PLAN NAVAL DE DESARROLLO,
 que establece 3 fases:
 1-  Establecimiento de sus bases para abarcar el anillo de islas primario (2010),;
 2-  Establecimiento de sus instalaciones y bases para abarcar el 2 anillo de islas (2020);
 y 3-  Establecimiento de zonas maritimas que pueda competir con la Armada de E.U. en el
   Oceano Indico y el  Pacifico (2050).

  Con esta avanzada planeada, sus rol de mantener un perfil bajo, SIN DECLARARSE POTENCIA
NAVAL AUN,  sus posturas son mantener en el menor grado, sus declaraciones de ser potencia,
y de estar a la altura de las circunstancias de imponer sus condiciones.

El hecho que esten participando con India, Brasil y Rusia, con financiamientos holgados y de las reservas propias, ha condicionado a una serie de acuerdos que no reflejan sus real intencion
de tener el poder sobre los diferentes puntos estrategicos en desarrollo.
 Veremos quiza ya muy tarde, los planes precisos de cada base, bastion y pais que negocio con
recursos de origen Chino, y sus obligaciones contraidas hacia la linea delgada del Poder Chino.






‘Blue-Water’ Navies in the Indian Ocean Region
What Indian and Chinese positions on their “blue-water” status says about strategy in the IOR.

By Abhijit Singh
January 21, 2015

In India’s strategic institutes and think-tanks, maritime analysts are sometimes faced with an uncomfortable question. “Why is it,” inquisitive observers wonder, “that the Indian Navy calls itself a blue-water navy, whereas the PLA-N – despite its vastly superior capabilities – is still ‘planning on’ attaining blue-water status? The query is mostly prompted by reports appearing in the media highlighting Chinese plans to augment sea-going capacity and make good on its distant-seas ambition.

Indeed, the speed and scope of China’s maritime development in recent years has been impressive enough to convince maritime observers of its blue-water potential. Over the past decade, China has taken huge strides in modernizing its navy, which now boasts an aircraft carrier, amphibious ships, nuclear submarines, and lethal anti-ship cruise and ballistic missiles. Yet it is hesitant to openly acknowledge great power maritime status. This oddity, though compelling, is more a matter of strategic nuance than substantive capability. The PLA-N’s understated valuation of its maritime prowess is not an acknowledgment of “modest” strength, but the product of a uniquely geopolitical process where competing navies deliberately re-interpret established maritime notions for favourable gains. Each appreciates the real issue at hand, yet assumes a position that suits individual national interests.

While both China and India covet strong maritime power status, each defines their own maritime capabilities differently. Chinese leaders and defence experts portray the PLA-N as a resurgent force with developing capabilities. New Delhi’s strategic elite, on the other hand, project the Indian navy as a potent instrument capable of providing security in the wider Indian Ocean Region. Notwithstanding the palpable differential in power and capability between the Indian Navy (IN) and the PLA-N, their real “blue-water” status is a matter of geopolitical outlook, rather than hard facts.

In theory, a blue-water navy is a maritime force capable of operating in the deep waters of the open oceans. The term is more colloquial than doctrinal and most sea-going states differ on its specifics. Broadly, however, most navies agree that a blue-water navy is capable of prolonged and sustained operations across the open oceans, and has a capacity to project “credible power” in the distant seas.

Even though it is smaller and less capable than its Chinese counterpart, the IN’s desire for blue-water status is driven by its keenness to be recognized as a regionally dominant force. To make itself relevant to the security and geopolitics of the Indian Ocean, the IN realizes it must dispel any impression that its mandate is limited to the brown water (coastal) or green water (littoral) functions. The PLA-N, on the other hand, despite its well-developed and growing capabilities, is reluctant to be seen as a blue-water force because of the obvious political implications, where Indian Ocean states might begin to view it as a dominant extra-regional entity. The political sensitivity about China’s perceived power-projection in the IOR places an imperative on the PLA-N to define its capabilities in conservative terms, lest its actions are misunderstood as being hegemonic in intent.

Deciphering China’s motivations in the far-seas, however, requires an appreciation of the historical context of its maritime development. In 1982, Chinese Admiral Liu Huaqing proposed a three stage maritime development plan that came to be accepted as the backbone of China’s future maritime strategy. The plan recommended that the PLA-N work towards the establishment of control over the first island chain by 2010; extend its maritime influence to the second island chain by 2020; and establish a force that would challenge the U.S. Navy in the Indian and Pacific Oceans by 2050. Until then, Huaqing (a former Vice-Chairman of the Central Military Commission and an adept strategic thinker) averred China must avoid an unnecessary projection of naval strength. In the main, the PLA-N’s development has proceeded along the track laid out in the original plan. It has developed strong capabilities but consciously understated its true potential.

In China’s viewing, there is only one globally relevant maritime force – the U.S. Navy. Chinese maritime experts admire the USN’s expeditionary and power projection capabilities, but their awe of the latter’s capabilities is overtaken by a strong sense of envy and inferiority. Consequently, China’s long-term ambition is to upstage U.S. naval power in the South China Seas and counter its dominance in the open oceans. Until that goal is achieved, however, Beijing sees no useful purpose in branding itself as a blue-water power. The Indian Navy, on the other hand, does not see the USN as a rival, or as a yardstick for future progress. In fact, recognition of its blue-water status by the USN and other Western powers validates the IN’s role as a security provider in the Indian Ocean Region.

This is not to suggest India’s dominant status in the IOR isn’t being challenged by China. The “blue-water” discussion is incomplete until one considers the role that Chinese economic activity plays in its maritime power projection. China’s penetration of the IOR continues apace with growing investment in maritime infrastructure and regional connectivity projects. According to recent reports, Beijing’s “One Belt One Road project” will result in the investment of nearly $40 billion in the region to create two separate land and sea transportation corridors. Unsurprisingly, Beijing has plans for military maritime presence in the region – made amply evident by its recent exercises in the IOR, including a submarine deployment in Colombo. And yet it is keen for the PLA-N to keep a low profile; which is why Chinese military leaders make it a point to highlight cooperative security and regional economic development in every multilateral interaction, including the recently concluded Gaulle Dialogue in Sri Lanka.

A closer look at the Chinese infrastructure projects, however, reveals a deeper motivation: China apparently desires de-facto control over maritime facilities it helps build and maintain. This is clear from the recent submarine deployment in Colombo. The submersible docked not at a berth belonging to the Sri Lanka Port Authority (SLPA) – mandated to accommodate military vessels – but the deep water Colombo South Container Terminal (CSCT), a facility built, controlled and run by a Chinese state-owned corporation – the China Merchants Holdings (International). While Sri Lankan authorities agreed that berthing at the facility constituted a violation of protocol, they offered perfunctory explanations for the breach – suggesting an inability on Colombo’s part to regulate PLA-N activity in a Sri Lankan port, at a facility controlled by a Chinese entity.

China’s maritime strategy, however, is not limited to stealthy control over domestic infrastructure in the IOR and manifests in other ways. In Hambantota, for instance, Colombo has agreed to grant Chinese state-owned companies operating rights to four berths in exchange for an easing of loan conditions. Using high-interest infrastructure loans as barter-chips for strategic concessions in the IOR is, in fact, an important tool in Beijing’s geopolitical toolkit. Another illustration of Beijing’s innovative strategy is at the iHavan project in Maldives (a key link on the Maritime Silk Route) where the high-premium loans awarded are bound to result in a request for a relaxation in loan conditions. In exchange, China would perhaps demand operating rights to another terminal.

As they jostle for space and supremacy in the IOR, the Indian Navy and PLA-N appear to be guided by distinct operational philosophies – the IN is driven its aspiration to be a leading regional security provider, while the PLA-N is manoeuvring to position itself as a guarantor of regional peace to advance a larger geopolitical agenda. It is, however, the Chinese strategy of fusing its maritime efforts with a broader plan for economic development and regional integration that is proving to be more effective. While India can still hope to counter China’s growing maritime power in the IOR with a pragmatic regional engagement plan, balancing Beijing’s economic outreach in the Indian Ocean might constitute a more complex challenge.


http://thediplomat.com/2015/01/blue-water-navies-in-the-indian-ocean-region/

Von Leunam
Capitán de Navio
Capitán de Navio

Mensajes : 6533
Masculino
Edad : 28
Localización : Imperial City, Coruscant

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Von Leunam el 11/3/2015, 7:55 pm

¿Dónde podría estallar el próximo gran conflicto con China?



China desarrolla rápidamente diferentes tecnologías de guerra como, por ejemplo, misiles balísticos y de crucero, armas de alta precisión, dispositivos de alerta temprana o de vigilancia. Sin embargo, el énfasis fundamental en la estrategia del Ejército Popular de Liberación de China podría ser el uso de operaciones de redes informáticas. De hecho, el próximo conflicto que involucre el país podría estallar en el ciberespacio. Las tecnologías informáticas y cibernéticas se desarrollan en China en paralelo a la modernización militar. Según la revista 'The National Interest', las operaciones de redes informáticas revisten una gran importancia para el Ejército Popular de Liberación de China (EPL) y es precisamente en este área podría empezar un eventual conflicto que involucre al país. Los futuros conflictos del EPL estarían bajo el paraguas de la Red Integrada de Guerra Electrónica, según la publicación.

El sistema paraliza los sistemas de información en la Red de un enemigo y crea "puntos ciegos" en contra de sus sistemas de Inteligencia, vigilancia y sistemas de reconocimiento. Si bien los detalles sobre las capacidades operativas específicas se mantienen en secreto, documentos accesibles al público de la Academia de Ciencias Militares indican que las fuerzas de Guerra Electrónica podrán interferir en sistemas electrónicos interrumpiendo el envío de información y que las unidades de ataque y explotación de redes informáticas podrán destruir las redes de enemigo usando ataques de virus y piratería. El concepto de Red Integrada de Guerra Electrónica se usaría en las primeras fases de conflicto: De forma preventiva y con el objetivo de cerrar el acceso del enemigo a información vital. La creciente integración de tecnologías cibernéticas tendría una gran importancia estratégica para China, concluye 'The National Interest'. (Jesús.R.G.)

Fuente: http://actualidad.rt.com/

http://poderiomilitar-jesus.blogspot.ca/2015/03/donde-podria-estallar-el-proximo-gran.html

Von Leunam
Capitán de Navio
Capitán de Navio

Mensajes : 6533
Masculino
Edad : 28
Localización : Imperial City, Coruscant

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Von Leunam el 26/5/2015, 6:25 pm

China amenaza a EE.UU. con un enfrentamiento militar



El diario chino ‘Global Times’, portavoz del Partido Comunista –PCCh-, lanzó una advertencia a Estados Unidos en su editorial: o deja de presionar a China para detener sus construcciones en las islas disputadas en el Pacífico, o "una confrontación militar empezará antes o después".

"China tiene otra línea roja, y es pedir a EE. UU. que respete su soberanía territorial y sus intereses marítimos en el mar de la China Meridional".

En un tono más belicoso del habitual, el editorial insta a Washington a que dé a China "espacio suficiente para su auge pacífico", y que, si bien el mar de la China Meridional, donde hay varias islas disputadas entre Pekín y países vecinos, "no es todo en las relaciones chino-estadounidenses", la cooperación bilateral puede verse "más o menos afectada por las agresiones del Pentágono".

El último de una serie de eventos que han escalado las tensiones entre China y EE. UU ocurrió el pasado miércoles, cuando un avión estadounidense de vigilancia P-8A voló por encima del archipiélago de las islas Spratly, en las que Pekín ha construido auténticos islotes artificiales.

El avión estadounidense recibió hasta ocho avisos por radio para que dejara la zona: "Ésta es la Armada china... Ésta es la Armada china... Por favor, váyanse para evitar malentendidos", según constató un equipo de la televisión CNN a bordo del aparato.

El editorial denuncia que el Pentágono se ha mantenido “impasible” después de lo ocurrido: "Estados Unidos está aumentando el riesgo de una confrontación física con China recientemente", apunta el diario, que, ante la situación, recomienda que ambas partes muestren sus líneas rojas para "ver si pueden respetar las del otro".

En un tono menos agresivo pero también severo, una portavoz del Ministerio de Exteriores, Hua Chunying, dijo este lunes que "es peligroso e irresponsable" lo que ocurrió con el avión estadounidense, y que su vuelo "podría haber causado algún error de cálculo". La portavoz urgió a "la parte americana a evitar errores, ser racional y no pronunciar palabras irresponsables".

El periódico ‘Global Times’ pertenece al mismo grupo que el ‘Diario del Pueblo’, brazo propagandístico del Partido Comunista chino -PCCh-. Sin embargo, el Global Times se centra más en asuntos militares. Hace sólo cuatro días, esta cabecera calificó a EE.UU. de “paranoico” sobre la expanción de China , después de que Washington acusara formalmente a seis ciudadanos del país asiático de posible espionaje económico.

http://www.onemagazine.es
Read more at http://tecnologamilitar.blogspot.com/2015/05/china-amenaza-eeuu-con-un.html#3kMEiw5QtvSwrKXt.99


Me recordo a los editoriales en los diarios nacionalistas rusos, franceses y alemanes antes de la WWI.

estril_02
Sargento Primero 1/o
Sargento Primero 1/o

Mensajes : 554
Masculino
Edad : 26
Localización : Oceano Pacifico

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por estril_02 el 26/5/2015, 6:44 pm

Auge "pacifico" tomando por la fuerza lo que para ellos es suyo, no ma..... No cabe duda que lo de primera potencia ya se le subió a la cabeza, a ver si alguien le pone un alto de una buena vez.

aztro
Sargento Primero 1/o
Sargento Primero 1/o

Mensajes : 590
Masculino
Edad : 27
Localización : edomex

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por aztro el 26/5/2015, 11:06 pm

estril_02 escribió:Auge "pacifico" tomando por la fuerza lo que para ellos es suyo, no ma..... No cabe duda que lo de primera potencia ya se le subió a la cabeza, a ver si alguien le pone un alto de una buena vez.

Sin duda, tienen que ser cuidadosos de los tiempos, China aun esta lejos militarmente de EUA.

chapulincolorado
Teniente de Fragata
Teniente de Fragata

Mensajes : 2568
Masculino
Edad : 26

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por chapulincolorado el 26/5/2015, 11:21 pm

china esta diseñando aviones para los que aun no tiene motores nadie (ni rusia) se los quiere vender porque se lo quieren piratear.

para fines prácticos no tiene portaaviones,

en fin hoy, hoy, hoy lo repito la pura septima flota podria detener cualquier intento de ponerse bronca china.

GALIL
Teniente
Teniente

Mensajes : 1420
Masculino
Edad : 42
Localización : Tejeringo el chico

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por GALIL el 27/5/2015, 12:01 am

Coincido... China hoy dia todavía está lejos, militarmente hablando, del poderío de los E.U.

Pero hay todavía algo mas importante que representa una barrera para una guerra con Estados Unidos, y eso se llama DINERO... Only Money... Cool

GALIL

chapulincolorado
Teniente de Fragata
Teniente de Fragata

Mensajes : 2568
Masculino
Edad : 26

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por chapulincolorado el 27/5/2015, 12:54 am

eso me recuerda a japon en la segunda guerra mundial estaba ampliando su influencia en el pacifico tratando de pasar sobre estados unidos .... cuando le compraba el 80% del petroleo a ..... estados unidos.

Takeda
Capitán de Navio
Capitán de Navio

Mensajes : 6851

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Takeda el 27/5/2015, 9:43 am

Pues no hay que olvidar el misil DF-21 "carrier-killer"; Aunque China está lejos militarmente de EE.UU., creo que tampoco sería fácil para los estadounidenses proyectar su poder sobre China, que a mi juicio podría aniquilar la flota estadounidense a base de éstos poderosos misiles. Para efectos prácticos Estados Unidos tendría que ubicar sus tropas en países aliados, para intentar golpear a China.

chapulincolorado
Teniente de Fragata
Teniente de Fragata

Mensajes : 2568
Masculino
Edad : 26

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por chapulincolorado el 27/5/2015, 4:54 pm

y no hay que olvidar que ese mentado misil nunca ha sido probado, no ha tenido su bautizo de fuego.

Takeda
Capitán de Navio
Capitán de Navio

Mensajes : 6851

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Takeda el 27/5/2015, 5:11 pm

chapulincolorado escribió:y no hay que olvidar que ese mentado misil nunca ha sido probado, no ha tenido su bautizo de fuego.

No pues si a esas vamos a quién le consta entonces la efectividad de los ICBM Trident, que tampoco han sido usados en combate nunca.

chapulincolorado
Teniente de Fragata
Teniente de Fragata

Mensajes : 2568
Masculino
Edad : 26

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por chapulincolorado el 27/5/2015, 8:00 pm

y que ni los prueben nunca en combate real (son de cabezas nucleares)

Rogersukoi27
Almirante
Almirante

Mensajes : 9945
Masculino
Edad : 58

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 28/5/2015, 12:41 am

Takeda escribió:Pues no hay que olvidar el misil DF-21 "carrier-killer"; Aunque China está lejos militarmente de EE.UU., creo que tampoco sería fácil para los estadounidenses proyectar su poder sobre China, que a mi juicio podría aniquilar la flota estadounidense a base de éstos poderosos misiles. Para efectos prácticos Estados Unidos tendría que ubicar sus tropas en países aliados, para intentar golpear a China.

Las pruebas del misil, fueron realizadas en ejercicios conjuntos de las 3 flotas Chinas en el mar de China
(flota del Sur, Centro y Norte) con sus naves nuevas de destructores y Fragatas, contra unidades
flotantes de cascajo( buques viejos de carga y de flota naval desechados) para probar sus efectos, y no
dejaron abordar a los medios extranjeros en dicho ejercicio, cuando lanzaron sus prototipos y los
utilizaron contra las unidades flotantes pasivas.
El ruido publicitario que hicieron los Chinos fue sobre la MANADA de misileras con capacidad de
lanzamiento en bulto, han tomado el perfil del sistema AEGIS, el cual se tiene antecedente de manejar
en conjunto 30 objetivos hostiles en su contra por nave de los E.U., y que de manera independiente,
han trabajado para actualizar en forma gradual, su version de AEGIS al 9.0 con las reservas de sus
adelantos.
Este ejercicio les ha dado optimismo, y los resultados obtenidos no causaron efectos negativos en
sus flotas contrincantes.
Los chinos plantean la tactica de lanzar desde 3 frentes (costa, aerea y flota misilera) en bloques de
60 misiles por evento contra el conjunto de objetivos definidos como naves hostiles, y que al
efectuar en esta tarifa por lanzamiento, vayan neutralizando en bloque a las naves de superficie
con estos misiles.
No sera facil neutralizar los efectos de estos juguetes sobre naves a flote.
Otro cantar sera, el marco submarino de E.U. que trae otros proyectos y adelantos y que no
queda revelado el impacto que puedan causar a los buques chinos desde sigilozos puntos
de lanzamiento, hacia sus propias posiciones ubicadas por la abultada identificacion de
unidades lanzadoras de misiles y sean neutralizados sin poder identificar su origen.
Los submarinos chinos tratan de emular estas maniobras sin tener referencia previa de sus
adelantos gabachos. qt Shocked

Takeda
Capitán de Navio
Capitán de Navio

Mensajes : 6851

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Takeda el 31/5/2015, 12:52 pm

Bajo la Lupa

Guerra mundial de EU contra Rusia y China, según George Soros


Alfredo Jalife-Rahme

El megaespeculador George Soros, presunto títere de los banqueros esclavistas Rothschild, advirtió sobre una inminente tercera guerra mundial entre Estados Unidos y China (http://goo.gl/qZuZqL).

Toda la plantilla de propaganda global vincu­lada a los Rothschild –que según la leyenda realizaron su enorme fortuna en Waterloo–propende a amenazar en forma permanente con la inminencia e inmanencia de una nueva guerra mundial, como la revista Commentary, portavoz de los neoconservadores straussianos (https://goo.gl/BbVdVw).

¿Desencajó a los Rothschild, quienes han pervivido de las guerras, la aparente reconciliación de Obama con el anatemizado presidente ruso Putin (http://goo.gl/yYwFUl)?

Durante la conferencia Bretton Woods en el Banco Mundial, Soros comentó que su guerra depende de la salud de la economía de China ya que, si su transición de una economía de exportaciones a una de consumo interno falla, existe una probabilidad de que sus dirigentes alienten un conflicto externo para mantener unido al país y permanecer en el poder.

Soros repite uno de los consabidos axiomas de El príncipe de Nicolás Maquiavelo, 483 años más tarde, y sentencia que si existe un conflicto entre China y un aliado militar de Estados Unidos como Japón, no es ninguna exageración (sic) decir que nos encontramos en el umbral de una tercera guerra mundial.

Este aserto temerario sería desechado ipso facto por el geoestratega Zbigniew Brzezinski, ex asesor de Seguridad Nacional de James Carter e íntimo de Obama, quien ha enunciado que Estados Unidos no debe ir a una guerra con China por Japón, que considera desechable.

¿Las élites financieristas occidentales amedrentan a China, tres meses antes de la trascendental visita del mandarín Xi a la Casa Blanca, sobre todo después de la asociación estratégica, que no militar, de China con Rusia (http://goo.gl/VCmHR6)?

Soros desinforma y abulta el gasto militar creciente de China (129 mil 400 millones de dólares) y Rusia (70 mil millones de dólares) que juntos, según el think tank británico International Institute for Strategic Studies, representan 34.32 por ciento del de Estados Unidos (581 mil millones de dólares). Un dato curioso: Arabia Saudita, a quien Estados Unidos y Gran Bretaña (GB) colman de juguetes bélicos, gasta más que Rusia: 80 mil 800 millones de dólares.

Soros –quien con los Rothschild sufrió una paliza en Ucrania– llega muy tarde a recomendar que Estados Unidos realice una concesión mayor para permitir el ingreso del yuan chino a la caduca canasta cuatripartita del FMI (dólar, euro, libra esterlina y yen nipón), que constituyen sus derechos especiales de giro (DEG), su moneda virtual, ya que se trata de una vieja noticia que es imparable, con o sin los Rothschild, y que puede ser oficial en octubre (http://goo.gl/4ASJiq).

A cambio de la incrustación del yuan a los DEG del FMI, Soros juzga que China deberá realizar similares concesiones mayores para reformar (¡supersic) su economía y admitir el imperio de la ley al estilo anglosajón.

Los decadentes banqueros Rothschild –a imagen y semejanza de la cada vez más irrelevante GB–, mediante su pugnaz y locuaz portavoz Soros, tienden una trampa financiero-legal a China, que no tiene por qué aceptar ninguna condicionante bajo el esquema israelí-anglosajón de dictar el destino y/o engranaje de su economía interna y global, amén de hipotecarla legalmente bajo la espada de Damocles del imperio de la ley y los muy trillados cuan fariseos derechos humanos que no practica en su propio suelo la alianza israelí-anglosajona.

Según Soros, permitir que el yuan sea una divisa de mercado creará una conexión vinculante entre los dos sistemas. ¿A qué precio aceptará Obama la incorporación inevitable del yuan a la canasta de los DEG del FMI? ¿El yuan incorporado a los DEG por Rusia? ¡Es muy barato!

GB ya se adelantó a Estados Unidos mediante su desleal incorporación al fulgurante banco chino de desarrollo (AIIB, por sus siglas en inglés), pese al anatema de Estados Unidos, mientras el megabanco británico HSBC regresa su matriz a sus orígenes primigenios en Hong Kong.

La rama británica de los banqueros Rothschild, mucho más pérfidos que los banqueros Rockefeller al otro lado del Atlántico, juegan ya bajo la mesa con China, en detrimento de los intereses de Estados Unidos.

Mientras las tratativas de los Rothschild/Soros con China suelen ser clandestinas, los dos geoestrategas útiles que quedan en Estados Unidos, Kissinger (vinculado a los intereses de los Rockefeller) y Zbigniew Brzezinski, coquetean con China para alejarla de Rusia mediante el engaño de un G-2 (Estados Unidos/China) para repartirse el mundo.

Pese a todos sus pecados capitales, Kissinger, a sus 91 años, lleva mayores ventajas que el rusófobo Zbigniew Brzezinski (de 86 años), al no haber golpeado de frente a Rusia, como este último que viene de sufrir una humillante derrota geoestratégica desde Debaltsevo hasta Sochi.

Soros juzga que sin el arreglo de Estados Unidos con China para incorporar el yuan a los DEG existe un verdadero peligro de que China se alinee con Rusia política y militarmente, y entonces (sic) la amenaza de una tercera guerra mundial sería real.

Los chinos no se chupan el dedo y están preparados ante cualquier eventualidad, cuando Rusia y Estados Unidos estuvieron a punto de librar una guerra nuclear con la escenografía del contencioso ucranio, como explayó hace ocho meses Han Xudong, profesor de la Universidad de Defensa Nacional del Ejército de Liberación del Pueblo de China (https://goo.gl/rGDiSO).

En esa ocasión Han Xudong comentó que conforme la crisis ucrania se profundiza, los observadores internacionales están cada vez más preocupados sobre un choque militar directo (¡supersic!) entre Estados Unidos y Rusia, ya que una vez que una rivalidad armada emerge, es probable (¡supersic!) que se extienda a todo el globo. Y no es imposible que se escenifique una guerra mundial (¡supersic!).

Hoy el profesor militar Han Xudong –que toma en cuenta las enseñanzas geopolíticas del almirante estadunidense Alfred Thayer Mahan y su concepto del poder marítimo– ha de estar más convencido de una conflagración global debido a la reciente escalada entre Estados Unidos y China en las disputadas islas del Mar del Sur de China.

Han Xudong sentencia que la confrontación del espacio marítimo global (¡supersic!), así como en el océano Ártico y los océanos Índico y Pacífico, ha visto la más feroz rivalidad, por lo que es probable que ahí se libre la tercera guerra mundial, por el combate por los derechos marítimos.

Comenta que los intereses extramarítimos de China se han visto cada vez más amenazados por Estados Unidos y aconseja que China no debe ser empujada a una posición pasiva, donde es vulnerable a los ataques, por lo que debe tener en mente una tercera guerra mundial al desarrollar sus fuerzas militares.

Global Times ha advertido que si Washington no cesa sus demandas de que Pekín frene la construcción de islas artificiales en el Mar del Sur de China, una guerra de Estados Unidos y China será inevitable (http://goo.gl/4tyXVW) , mientras Rusia considera que la “presencia de barcos estadunidenses en el Mar del Sur de China puede desembocar en una guerra entre Estados Unidos y China (http://goo.gl/fgtpOU)”.

Lo trágico sería que Rusia, China y Estados Unidos sucumban a la trampa financierista de los Rothschild y su nuevo Waterloo 200 años más tarde.

www.alfredojalife.com

@AlfredoJalifeR_

https://www.facebook.com/AlfredoJalife

http://vk.com/id254048037


ENLACE: http://www.jornada.unam.mx/2015/05/31/opinion/016o1pol

Rogersukoi27
Almirante
Almirante

Mensajes : 9945
Masculino
Edad : 58

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 31/5/2015, 5:35 pm


Con la nueva alianza (Rusia -China) de caracter comercial, no podemos olvidar que el poder financiero
(Rockefeller-Rotschild) que se firmo el pasado febrero del 2014, tiene objetivos muy claros de concentrar
los recursos en unas cuantas familias..... sin dejar de incluir otros nombres.
La partida actual de bipolarizar los recursos, no se puede entender por los antiguos protocolos del sistema
financiero internacional.
Augurar un buen resultado de sus inteciones de continuar con el control del dinero(judio-internacional),
se tendra que determinar quienes poseen los instrumentos de control de valores (mercado del dinero, de metales, de alimentos,de commodities, etc) para determinar la influencia de la fuerza monetaria en el sosten belico del orbe.

Ya sabemos que este grupo (semi oculto de poder) siempre busca ganar con las guerras y la tecnologia avanzada
que realiza sus experimentos a costa del sacrificio de etnias y naciones menos privilegiadas, mas ahora tendran
que entender que no hay un solo grupo de poder....a menos que no hayan sido invitados previamente al mismo club!!!!!! La inminente tension previa a la guerra, se esta construyendo, cuanto tiempo tardara la revelacion de
la NUEVA ERA GEOPOLITICA, para que no tengan que realizar dichos enfrentamientos letales????
Veremos y diremos!!! study

Perseo
Teniente
Teniente

Mensajes : 1974

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Perseo el 31/5/2015, 6:22 pm

China es el nuevo gigante dormido para una futura tercera guerra mundial.

Rogersukoi27
Almirante
Almirante

Mensajes : 9945
Masculino
Edad : 58

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 4/6/2015, 2:21 am




Mientras las naciones de Japon, Australia, Malasia y demas paises convocados con
sus unidades navales para un ejercicio de desembarco en una isla (seleccionada en una
de las islas de Hawaii para practicas de desembarco), los Chinos se muestran airosos
de tener sus propias maniobras navales conjuntas con el pequeño (mas no pobre)
pais de Sigapur.
En las faenas navales, se realizaron ejercicios de pruebas de tiro a objetivos flotantes,
al igual que maniobras de zigzag y travesia conjunta, al igual que practicas en simulador
con ejercicios y maniobras interactuadas.
Este pequeño ejercicio, (2 Unidades de Singapur- Fragata y una Corveta, junto a una
Fragata China) que si bien, no representa una gran presencia naval, si simboliza el
aspecto de buscar aliados en la zona del Sur de Asia, para contrarrestar el fuerte
antagonismo de India, Filipinas, Vietnam, Malasia, Japon y atras de ellos los E.U.






Singapore, China complete inaugural bilateral naval exercise


Singapore and China's navies complete their first-ever four-day Exercise Maritime Cooperation, which involves the RSS Intrepid, the RSS Valiant and the Yulin frigate.

POSTED: 25 May 2015 22:36 UPDATED: 26 May 2015 07:37

The RSS Valiant (left) and RSS Intrepid (right) participating in a manoeuvring exercise with the Yulin (middle). (Photo: People's Liberation Army [Navy])


SINGAPORE: The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) and China’s People’s Liberation Army (Navy) on Monday (May 25) concluded a new joint naval exercise, hailed as a "milestone in the bilateral defence relationship", by Singapore’s Ministry of Defence (MINDEF).

The inaugural four-day Exercise Maritime Cooperation series involved RSN’s RSS Intrepid frigate and RSS Valiant missile corvette, as well as China’s Yulin frigate. The exercise involved conventional naval warfare serials, such as gunnery firings and manoeuvring drills, said MINDEF in a news release.

Personnel from both navies also took part in exercise planning and combined simulator training.



Singapore and China naval personnel training together at the Damage Control Training Centre at Changi Naval Base (Photo: MINDEF)

Both navies “can learn from each other and deepen professional knowledge to strengthen mutual trust and understanding,” said RSN Fleet commander Colonel Lew Chuen Hong, in highlighting the growth in professional interactions between RSN and the Chinese navy.

“Exercise Maritime Cooperation reflects our common goals and beliefs, and is a new achievement of the exchanges and interactions between both our navies," said Commander South Sea Fleet Rear Admiral Shen Jinlong from the Chinese navy.

MINDEF said the new bilateral naval exercise underscores warm and growing ties between the two countries, as they mark 25 years since the establishment of diplomatic ties this year.


http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/singapore-china-complete/1871162.html

Takeda
Capitán de Navio
Capitán de Navio

Mensajes : 6851

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Takeda el 4/6/2015, 8:08 am

Por cierto, no hay que olvidar que Malasia y Singapur en algún momento han funcionado como confederación. La estrategia china siempre ha sido tratar de mantener buenas relaciones con todos, me pregunto si Malasia y Singapur (de etnia china) no han decidido hacer lo mismo mediante el reparto del trabajo, como un par de socios atendiendo cada quién a un cliente.

chapulincolorado
Teniente de Fragata
Teniente de Fragata

Mensajes : 2568
Masculino
Edad : 26

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por chapulincolorado el 4/6/2015, 10:05 am

Singapur (de etnia china)
espero que no lo quieran persuadir a lo putin como en ucrania con el pretexto de las "etnias chinas".

Enemigo Público
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya
Kapitan - Sovetskaya Armiya

Mensajes : 7809
Masculino
Edad : 28
Localización : Huaxyacac

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Enemigo Público el 4/6/2015, 10:24 am

chapulincolorado escribió:
Singapur (de etnia china)
espero que no lo quieran persuadir a lo putin como en ucrania con el pretexto de las "etnias chinas".
Se ve que no aprendes, Rusia es otra historia, igual los procesos en Ucrania.

A China no le importa Singapur, ni siquera colindan.

Rogersukoi27
Almirante
Almirante

Mensajes : 9945
Masculino
Edad : 58

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 4/6/2015, 1:06 pm

Takeda escribió:Por cierto, no hay que olvidar que Malasia y Singapur en algún momento han funcionado como confederación. La estrategia china siempre ha sido tratar de mantener buenas relaciones con todos, me pregunto si Malasia y Singapur (de etnia china) no han decidido hacer lo mismo mediante el reparto del trabajo, como un par de socios atendiendo cada quién a un cliente.

De hecho, los integrantes de la alianza sudasiatica, (Filipinas, Indonesia, Malasia, Singapur, Tailandia, etc) han tenido buena relacion entre ellos, desarrollando proyectos, promoviendo alianzas y participando
con relaciones comerciales (SUPPLYCHAIN) entre ellos.
La mezcla etnica de Hindus, malayos, indonesios y micronesios, Chinos, Tailandeses, etc entre estas naciones no estan fuera de esa realidad.
Este ejercicio no hace mella, lo de mas impacto es la presencia de los submarinos nucleares
que ya fueron detectados en el Indico y que por desdicha, no han logrado la maxima capacidad de
sigilo (silencio de sus propulsores y generadores al 100%) como lo han hecho los Ruskis!!!.

Takeda
Capitán de Navio
Capitán de Navio

Mensajes : 6851

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Takeda el 4/6/2015, 1:11 pm

chapulincolorado escribió:
Singapur (de etnia china)
espero que no lo quieran persuadir a lo putin como en ucrania con el pretexto de las "etnias chinas".

Tú no te preocupes Chapulín, haz de cuenta que no escribí nada, Estados Unidos garantiza la paz en el Mundo, y estamos a todo dar..

Von Leunam
Capitán de Navio
Capitán de Navio

Mensajes : 6533
Masculino
Edad : 28
Localización : Imperial City, Coruscant

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Von Leunam el 27/10/2015, 6:34 am

EE UU desafía a China al enviar un buque de guerra a aguas en disputa



La Marina de Estados Unidos envió este lunes un buque de guerra a navegar en los alrededores de una islas artificiales construidas por el Gobierno de Pekín en el mar del sur de China, según funcionarios citados por medios de comunicación estadounidenses. El buque, equipado con misiles, navegó dentro de aguas territoriales reclamadas por Pekín. Supone uno de los mayores desafíos de Washington al creciente expansionismo chino en esa zona.

El comandante Bill Urban, portavoz del Pentágono, declinó comentar sobre asuntos “específicos de la operación”, pero confirmó que EE UU “está llevando a cabo operaciones rutinarias en el mar del sur de China acordes a la ley internacional”. “Fuerzas de EE UU operan a diario en Asia Pacífico, incluido el mar del sur de China”, dijo a última hora del lunes en un comunicado remitido a EL PAÍS.

El Gobierno chino, que considera la defensa de esos islotes una de las prioridades de su política militar, trata de establecer exactamente si el buque estadounidense entró dentro de lo que considera sus aguas territoriales. "Si es verdad, aconsejamos a EE UU que lo piense dos veces antes de actuar", ha declarado el ministro de Exteriores chino, Wang Yi, durante la celebración de un seminario en Pekín. Wang instó a Washington a "no actuar de manera imprudente y no crear problemas de la nada".

Horas antes, la Casa Blanca y el Departamento de Estado habían defendido el derecho de EE UU a actuar. “No tienes que consultar a ninguna nación cuando estás ejercitando tu derecho a la libertad de navegación en aguas internacionales”, dijo el portavoz del Departamento de Estado, John Kirby, en una rueda de prensa. En los últimos meses, EE UU también ha justificado en la defensa de la libertad de navegación el envío de navíos militares al golfo de Adén, frente a la costa de Yemen.



El buque estadounidense navegó dentro de un área a 12 millas náuticas de distancia de las islas Spratly, cuya soberanía también reclama Filipinas. EE UU ya navegó en esa área en 2012 pero entonces las islas no estaban construidas. Es la primera vez que lo hace desde el inicio del proceso de levantamiento de las islas a finales de 2013.

Las 12 millas de distancia determinan por ley el territorio marítimo de un Estado. Según la convención de ley marítima de la ONU, ese límite no es aplicable a islas levantadas sobre arrecifes previamente sumergidos, lo que lleva a EE UU a subrayar que cumple la ley.

La primera potencia mundial teme que la segunda potencia tenga fines militares en la construcción de islas en aguas que reclaman desde hace tiempo media docena de países, y ubicadas en una concurrida y estratégica zona de tráfico marítimo comercial. Pekín esgrime que las islas tendrán principalmente objetivos civiles, pero también finalidades militares indefinidas.

Con el envío del buque, EE UU busca mandar un mensaje de firmeza a China. El Gobierno de Barack Obama ha hecho del viraje a Asia una de sus prioridades geoestratégicas y ha criticado las reclamaciones marítimas chinas. La entrada del destructor en aguas en disputa llega un mes después de que se reunieran en Washington Obama y su homólogo chino, Xi Jinping. Xi dijo entonces que China no tenía “intención de militarizar” las islas.

En mayo, aviones estadounidenses sobrevolaron los alrededores de las islas pero sin penetrar el límite de 12 millas. En 2013, dos bombarderos estadounidenses volaron en otra zona que se disputan China y Japón. China también ha hecho movimientos provocadores: en septiembre buques chinos navegaron dentro del límite de 12 millas en los alrededores de unas islas estadounidenses y rusas frente a la costa de Alaska.

Desde 2012 China ha incluido las islas en disputa en el mar del Sur de China, a distancias de hasta 1.300 kilómetros de la costa continental, en sus "intereses nacionales básicos". En mayo pasado anunció un giro en su estrategia militar para poner el énfasis en la modernización de su Marina y en la defensa de las aguas abiertas, no únicamente el territorio continental.

http://internacional.elpais.com/internacional/2015/10/27/estados_unidos/1445916349_516315.html

Von Leunam
Capitán de Navio
Capitán de Navio

Mensajes : 6533
Masculino
Edad : 28
Localización : Imperial City, Coruscant

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Von Leunam el 27/10/2015, 6:35 am

China se enfurece por la presencia de EE UU junto a sus islas artificiales



Como era de prever, Pekín ha reaccionado con furia a la incursión de un buque de guerra de la Marina de Estados Unidos en los alrededores de las islas artificiales en el mar del sur de China cuya soberanía reclama. El barco Lassen, equipado con misiles, entró en esas aguas “de manera ilegal” y fue “supervisado, seguido y advertido” por las fuerzas chinas, ha asegurado el portavoz del Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores en Pekín, Lu Kang.

El Gobierno chino “se opone de manera tajante a que cualquier país emplee la libertad de navegación y de sobrevuelo como pretexto para perjudicar la soberanía nacional y los intereses de seguridad de China”, subrayó Lu. Pekín “defenderá vigorosamente su soberanía territorial” y ha presentado ya su protesta ante EE UU tanto en la capital china como en Washington, declaró.

Poco antes, el ministro de Exteriores, Wang Yi, había instado a Washington a “no actuar de manera imprudente y no crear problemas de la nada”.

El paso del barco por la zona vuelve a elevar la tensión entre las dos grandes potencias en el mar del sur de China. Pekín se atribuye con un tono cada vez más firme territorio que se disputan media docena de países y ha acelerado la construcción de islas artificiales sobre arrecifes parcialmente sumergidos. Washington, que no cuenta con reclamaciones territoriales en la zona pero sí con numerosos intereses geoestratégicos, insiste en que no reconoce las exigencias de Pekín sobre aguas que considera internacionales y va a ejercer su derecho a la libre navegación en el área pase lo que pase.

En una rueda de prensa, el portavoz del Departamento de Estado, John Kirby, había declarado horas antes lo siguiente: “No tienes que consultar a ninguna nación cuando estás ejerciendo tu derecho a la libertad de navegación en aguas internacionales”.

El buque estadounidense entró dentro de un área a 12 millas náuticas de distancia de las islas Spratly, cuya soberanía también reclama Filipinas. EE UU ya navegó en esa zona en 2012, pero entonces las islas no estaban construidas.

Las 12 millas de distancia determinan por ley el territorio marítimo de un Estado. Según la convención de ley marítima de la ONU, ese límite no es aplicable a islas levantadas sobre arrecifes previamente sumergidos, lo que lleva a EE UU a subrayar que cumple la ley.

Pero el Gobierno chino considera desde 2012 esos islotes, así como las Paracel y los bancos de Scarborough, parte de sus “intereses nacionales básicos”, al mismo nivel que Tíbet o Taiwán. La rápida modernización de su Marina, convertida en una de sus grandes prioridades estratégicas, tiene como fin, entre otras cosas, defender ese territorio en caso de conflicto. Y en 18 meses, según EE UU, ha construido más de 800 hectáreas de terreno, más que el resto de los países reclamantes juntos.

Pekín asegura que sus trabajos tendrán fines civiles, como la pesca o la observación meteorológica, pero también ha admitido que contarán con fines militares. Washington, que bajo la Administración Obama ha hecho de la vuelta a Asia Pacífico una de las prioridades de su política exterior y de defensa, teme que China tenga como principal motivación esos fines militares, en una de las zonas con mayor tránsito marítimo comercial del mundo. Anualmente la atraviesan unos 50.000 barcos, y el 80% de las importaciones chinas y japonesas pasan por allí.

El Gobierno en Pekín insiste en que nunca dará pasos para perjudicar esa libre circulación. “Bienes por valor de billones de dólares circulan anualmente por esa zona. El mar del sur de China es vital para el comercio global y el desarrollo del país. Pekín no tienen ninguna razón para crear problemas que puedan bloquear una de sus propias arterias comerciales”, sostiene este martes la agencia oficial china, Xinhua.

La entrada del barco Lassen en aguas en disputa llega un mes después de que se reunieran en Washington Barack Obama y su homólogo chino, Xi Jinping. Xi dijo entonces que China no tenía “intención de militarizar” las islas.

En mayo, aviones estadounidenses sobrevolaron los alrededores de las islas pero sin sobrepasar el límite de 12 millas. En 2013, dos bombarderos estadounidenses volaron en otra zona que se disputan China y Japón.

China también ha hecho movimientos provocadores: en septiembre, buques chinos navegaron dentro del límite de 12 millas en los alrededores de unas islas estadounidenses y rusas frente a la costa de Alaska.

http://internacional.elpais.com/internacional/2015/10/27/actualidad/1445943159_954976.html

Rogersukoi27
Almirante
Almirante

Mensajes : 9945
Masculino
Edad : 58

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 21/5/2016, 7:15 pm







Las aportaciones de los 2 pilares economicos de la region de Asia del Sureste, Japon y China,
presentan 2 caracteristicas antagonicas, mismas que la region, han sabido capitalizar y
por el otro lado, presentan 2 teatros de accion diferentes, para las naciones de la region.
Japon ha seguido consistente con el desarrollo de relaciones constantes y crecientes entre
Naciones y bloques economicos, mientras que LA DOBLE MASCARA CHINA, ha determinado
una aceptacion de relaciones comerciales entre dichos paises y China, y por el escenario
de su propia seguridad, HAN DESPERTADO ALERTA Y PROBABLE AMENAZA CRECIENTE por
parte de China en la region.


Ante ambas estrategias, los paises del Sur de China, han decidido tomar acciones de proteccion
mutua, de solidez de ejercicios militares con claridad de mando, asi como los reclamos
genuinos de su soberania territorial, maritima y hasta la aerea en sus propios terrenos.

Continuar sin percibir los efectos de estas modalidades, seria cerrar los ojos de sus flaquezas
y sus incapacidades para responder en consecuencia.









How China Boosts Japan's Security Role in Southeast Asia


China’s claims to the South China Sea are accelerating a trend of growing security cooperation between Japan and ASEAN.

By Anh Duc Nguyen
May 16, 2016
1.2k 8 13
1.2k Shares

Japan and China are among the biggest powers in Asia, and both consider their relations with Southeast Asia to have strategic significance. The two countries vigorously compete with each other in asserting their overall influence on the region. However, in terms of maintaining stability and security for Southeast Asia, while Japan is moving in a mutually beneficial direction that is largely supported by Southeast Asian nations, China is doing the opposite. Beijing increasingly appears to be a security threat for the region due to rising tensions with ASEAN states over territorial disputes in the South China Sea. Below, I outline the history and trends of both China and Japan’s engagement with Southeast Asia, and how the South China Sea disputes are affecting their rivalry in the region.

Japan’s security role in Southeast Asia

Japan-Southeast Asia security relations began in the colonial period, when Japan implemented its Greater East Asia Co-prosperity Sphere, which in fact was a cover for Japanese expansionism aimed at exploiting natural resources in Southeast Asia. As part of the U.S. Cold War strategy to contain Communism, Japan became an industrial hub and driving force for East Asia’s economic growth. This resulted in Japan’s restoration of economic relations with Southeast Asia as well as turning the region into a shield against Chinese Communism.

Under Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida (1946-47, 1948-54), Japan focused on a policy of economic diplomacy with limited involvement in Southeast Asia’s security affairs. Japan continued its minimal involvement in the political and security affairs of Southeast Asia through 1974, with two minor exceptions. Tokyo participated in international peace observation in Indochina in 1968, and sent a mediation team in 1970 to end the Vietnam War.

The 1975-1989 period witnessed a fundamental change in Japan’s policy to Southeast Asia. Japan began considering relations with ASEAN countries as of vital significance to its foreign policy in Southeast Asia. In Japan’s view, ASEAN was an important institution for regional political stability and as a key source of economic security, resources, markets, investment and maritime communication. Moreover, ASEAN also played a vital role in the regional balance of power because the organization’s members at the time (Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand) were anti-Communist and enjoyed good relations with non-Communist states. In 1977, Japan initiated the Fukuda doctrine that confirmed Tokyo’s willingness to act as a mediator between ASEAN and Indochina and assist in constructing a stable order for Southeast Asia. Japan had volunteered itself for a larger role in Southeast Asian security.

In the post-Cold War period, Japan continued enhancing its security relations with Southeast Asia by seeking deeper involvement in regional affairs. Japan’s relations with Southeast Asia moved beyond economic cooperation to become more engaged in political and security issues in the region. One of the outstanding contributions Japan made to regional security in the 1990s was its support for ASEAN to establish the ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF) in 1994. This was the first multilateral security dialogue discussing security issues and regional stability in Southeast Asia. Generally speaking, Japan has become an active participant in multilateral security affairs in Southeast Asia and maintained a positive security influence on the region since 1975.

Japan played the role of a mediator in the territorial disputes over the South China Sea as far back as 1995, when China constructed permanent structure on Mischief Reef. Japan urged China to handle the dispute with the Philippines peacefully.

Japan has also become an active contributor to other Southeast Asian security affairs, especially in terms of human security. Due to its military occupation of Southeast Asia during World War II, Japan today seeks to avoid a direct military engagement approach toward regional security issues of the region. Instead, Tokyo relies on human security cooperation as a way to further its security role beyond economic influence in Southeast Asia.

Besides providing long-term official development assistance, which effectively helps Southeast Asian economies to generate growth and jobs, Japan has actively contributed to and participated in disaster relief and peacekeeping activities in the region. This includes providing financial assistance in the aftermath of the 1997-98 Asian financial crisis to stabilize the regional economies and restore social and political stability, peacemaking operations in Cambodia and Aceh, and peace building in Timor-Leste, Aceh, and Mindanao. Another good example is Japan’s proactive role in joint training, information-sharing, fact-finding, and joint patrolling with Malaysia, the Philippines, and Singapore to combat piracy in the Malacca Strait.

Given its continuously active contributions to and participation in regional security issues, Japan has been successful in building trust and confidence in its security relations with Southeast Asian nations. In the perception of ASEAN nations, the image of a militaristic Japan in World War II has gradually been replaced by a more reliable and trustworthy Japan.

China’s security role in Southeast Asia

Meanwhile, China’s relations with Southeast Asian nations before 1990 were characterized by instability and distrust because of China’s support for insurgencies in Malaysia, the Philippines, Myanmar, Thailand, and Laos. In fact, fears of Communist China helped led to the creation of ASEAN in 1967. Tensions between China and its neighbors in Southeast Asia, especially Vietnam, the site of China’s last war, lasted for decades.

In the early 1990s, however, China started to change its foreign policies toward Southeast Asia, with an aim to foster economic growth and try to make regional nations regard China as a responsible power. China has also began participating in ARF and ASEAN Plus Three as part of its stated commitment to multilateral security cooperation. Apart from seeking institutional engagement with the region, China has actively maintained bilateral security cooperation with many ASEAN nations (e.g. Chinese and Thai special forces hold joint exercises; annual China-Singapore defense policy dialogue, etc.). In 2002, China signed the Declaration on the Conduct of Parties in the South China Sea to ease fears about Beijing’s unilateral actions from ASEAN states that have competing claims in the South China Sea.

However, China’s security outreach to Southeast Asia hasn’t quelled concern over the massive military build-up underway in Beijing. Since 1988, China has continuously increased its defense budget, by double-digits in most years. The money has gone to vigorous modernization of China’s armed forces, especially the navy, air force, and missile forces. In addition, China established a new naval base on Hainan Island, which is close to Southeast Asia.

China’s military build-up combined with its U-shaped claim over the South China Sea, has created anxiety and security uncertainty for the region and forced Southeast Asian nations in an unexpected arms race with Beijing. The territorial disputes between China and Southeast Asian nations have also prevented China and ASEAN from fully implementing regional efforts in dealing with common issues, such as navigational safety, environment protection and piracy.

In the case of security ties with ASEAN, China’s loss is Japan’s potential gain. Tensions with China over territorial disputes in the South China Sea have forced some ASEAN states, especially the Philippines and Vietnam, to turn to external alliances as a way of strengthening capabilities to counter China. In the case of the Philippines, in addition to enhancing military ties with the United States, the Philippine government is considering Japan as a strong security partner.

From Japan’s strategic view, there’s good reason to strengthen security cooperation with Vietnam and the Philippines. Vietnam has the region’s second longest coastline and is an ideal choice for maritime security cooperation. The Philippines, meanwhile, occupies one of the world’s most important and busiest sea lanes of communication with its widespread maritime territories. More than 80 percent of the crude oil and 60 percent of the energy supplied to Japan go through this sea lane.

In fact, Japan has already moved to cement its security cooperation with the Philippines and Vietnam. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s paid visits to the Philippines and Vietnam in 2015 and 2013. During these visits, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe proposed enhancing bilateral cooperation, which included maritime security cooperation, defense capacity building, and human resource development with his counterparts in Manila and Hanoi. Japan has also provided defense technology, offering 10 multi-role response vessels to improve the Philippines’ surveillance capacity along with high-tech communication system for maritime safety. Likewise, Japan is providing six maritime patrol vessels to Vietnam.

Along with Japan’s improved economic, political and diplomatic relations with the region, Japan’s security relations with Southeast Asia have become more active over recent years. In return, Japan has gained more trust and confidence from Southeast Asian nations as all parties seek to cope with emerging challenges facing the region. By contrast, China is viewed threat to stability and security for Southeast Asia due to its military build-up and ambitious sovereignty claims, which have been strongly opposed by many ASEAN states. As a result, Japan’s security cooperation with Southeast Asian nations is likely to continue apace, while China’s ties with the region will be hampered by growing tenions.

http://thediplomat.com/2016/05/how-china-boosts-japans-security-role-in-southeast-asia/

Contenido patrocinado

Re: Una guerra “en teoría” contra China

Mensaje por Contenido patrocinado Hoy a las 12:10 pm


    Fecha y hora actual: 8/12/2016, 12:10 pm